The Heavy Breathing Zone

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Cut N Run
 
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The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby Cut N Run » February 28th, 2011, 10:43 am

I enjoyed Jim Spencer's article "The Heavy Breathing Zone" because it reminds me of the times I have been caught unprepared when a gobbler made himself known closer than I imagined any might be to me. It is shocking to hear a loud gobble when you are not expecting one so close.

I can remember once standing to relieve myself after hours of fruitless hunting and just before sitting back down, tossing a series of yelps out, only to almost have my cap blown off my head from a nearby gobbler. I probably would have wet my britches then if I hadn't already just taken care of business. He was on top of me before I could get my gloves back on. I was lucky enough to tag him even though he was getting extremely nervous just before I shot.

I have been abused by birds that came in silent and the only way I knew they were there was the sound of their putts as they put distance between us after busting me. That sound is just as alarming, yet more aggravating than having one gobble in your face when you're not prepared. Keeping focus and staying set to spring like a trap can wear on your nerves, especially if you haven't been hearing any turkey sounds for a time.

I love having gobblers come in close, especially spitting & drumming, even if it doesn't always work out. The old heart muscle sure gets a workout regardless.

Turkeys own me.

Jim
Luck Counts, good or bad

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MAKEemQUIVER
 
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RE: The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby MAKEemQUIVER » March 2nd, 2011, 3:07 pm

Really enjoyed the article myself Jim. All I could think about was about five years ago a bird had got henned up on me so I gave him a couple of hours and moved toward the last place that I had heard them. I stopped just shy of a rise and let out some soft yelps with my slate call. I got the third yelp out the bird gobbles at no more than twenty yards, just over the rise.

I can just imagine what I looked like when that bird gobbled. I layed on my belly and readied the gun, after about a minute I let out some yelps with my diaphram and he gobbled in the same spot. A couple of minutes later still no turkey I cutt at the bird and when he gobbled he was probably 75 yards away. I slipped up to have a look and the three hens were takeing away from me.

The next day I evened the score though, I got the lead hen mad right at daylight and she led the ol boy right to my gun barrell.

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dewey
 
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RE: The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby dewey » March 3rd, 2011, 9:34 am

I haven't had anything like this happen yet but hopefully by me reading the article and you guys posts that if/when it happens I will be somewhat prepared.

Dewey
"Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will." --Mahatma Gandhi

"Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat."--F. Scott Fitzgerald, American writer

       

Jim Spencer
 
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RE: The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby Jim Spencer » March 4th, 2011, 9:41 am

Naw, Dewey, you won't be prepared. Not most of the time, at any rate. That's what makes this stuff so addictive.
Never let 'em see the whites of your eyes...

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retranger
 
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RE: The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby retranger » March 4th, 2011, 3:10 pm

Jim are you associated with the "Turkey Hunting Digest"?
What works for me may not work for you and what works today may not work tomorrow
Doug <- <- ~<- <- <- ~ <-

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mark hay
 
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RE: The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby mark hay » March 6th, 2011, 12:39 am

I just finished reading the article moments ago . Like others here my mind flooded with memories of screwed up opportunities .
 
 The title itself causes me much grief , though I somehow manage to kill a bird once in a while . Being calm and really connected in thoughts and actions and suddenly there's a vibrating buzz in your ears . Eyeballs begin rapidly rolling back and forth to try to locate the drummer. Heart rate ramps up to about the treadmill test and the heavy breathing comes on. Trying to control the breathing so I can hear better and the light headed sensation pops up . And if it's cold the fog bellows from the facenet ! Surely that ol' gobbler can hear my heartbeat .
 
 Very fine article , as always Jim .

TeocTom
 
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RE: The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby TeocTom » March 17th, 2011, 5:09 pm

Guys, my first experience with a Gobbler got me so worked up that I honestly wasn't thinking. I get out of my truck, take 5 steps down the road and a Gobbler fires off what sounds like right over my head. I jump in bushes, trying to find him........hoot owl is making him shock gobble. I let out light yelps and he fires back. I am really worked up now. I pull out my slate, try to use it, but all it sounds like is morse code.
I had to switch back to my mouth call...and of course I am so charged with adrenaline I get too agressive.
That gobble going off over my head messed me up!!!!!!
Eric
Team 4
Turkeys on a Plane

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paboxcall
 
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RE: The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby paboxcall » March 19th, 2011, 2:48 pm

My first gobbler with a trumpet happened this way, two seasons ago. Birds were gobbling great on the roost opening week, but hitting the ground and going quiet. Fifth day I ended up, unknowingly, in the same hemlocks the birds were roosted in. They had been quiet the evening before.

It was overcast that morning, and daybreak came late. I heard one bird way off in the distance, and waited about five minutes, not certain which direction to head. I grabbed my owl hooter to try and get that bird to rip one more time, and as the hooter touched my lips, a gobbler sounded off right above me. I hit the ground, pulled on my mask, and this bird just starting gobbling like crazy.

Getting a decent yelp out of that trumpet was the hardest thing I've ever done. A few soft clucks, few soft yelps, and the bird roared right back, still in the tree. Next thing I know here comes another long beard from behind heading straight to the gobbler ripping in the hemlocks in front of me.

He walked by at 8 steps, and dropped the hammer.

My heart was pounding so loud and hard, it was an awesome experience.

John
"So much of this business of hunting turkeys, you stupid it up right at the last.
You do everything right for an hour and a half, and then you sit down here
and there's nothing you can do about it, you made a mistake."
Tom Kelly, [i]Turkey Tales

Jim Spencer
 
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RE: The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby Jim Spencer » May 26th, 2011, 9:19 am

ORIGINAL: retranger

Jim are you associated with the "Turkey Hunting Digest"?


Yep, Doug, guilty as charged. I wrote it in 2003, and it's sold well. I wanted to call it something else, so as not to confuse it with Dwain Bland's great book called "Turkey Hunter's Digest," but the publisher had just bought the rights to the "Digest" series from DBI Books, the outfit that published Bloand's book, and they were bound and determined to use it.

I've still got a few copies if you're interested - my web site has 'em for sale (www.treblehookunlimited.com).

Sorry I didn't see this post earlier, but in early March I was busy getting my game face on. Didn't have much time for frivolous stuff like web site forums.

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retranger
 
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RE: The Heavy Breathing Zone

Postby retranger » May 26th, 2011, 1:25 pm

If I didn't have a copy I sure would get one. That was the first and only turkey book I purchased when I started chasing those fools. The rest of my help came from the field. Good book. I still referr to it.
What works for me may not work for you and what works today may not work tomorrow
Doug <- <- ~<- <- <- ~ <-

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