Is there a better way?

Your place to talk about anything and everything hunting-related!
User avatar
WillowRidgeCalls
 
Posts: 3514
Joined: May 25th, 2009, 4:26 pm
Location: Reeseville Wisconsin

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » January 26th, 2014, 12:07 pm

When I gobble, I want to be the first bird gobbling on the roost that tells the local birds there is a new boy in their house. If the dominant bird is still there (meaning he has been taken out) he will be answering you with a blasting gobble, saying how dare you come in here strutting your stuff! Cut his gobble off with your gobble, it challenges his dominance, and you can bet he'll be coming to put you in your place, especially if a hen roosted with him answers your challenging gobbles, and most times it won't be with tree talk, answere her with a responding gobble. If he doesn't come in at flydown, I'll re-gobble after a while and answer my gobble with some excited hen talk. That's telling him he's loosing a girlfriend to another bird. If the boss gobbler has been removed most times you'll get two or three birds answering your gobble, meaning a new boss hasn't been established yet. If I have more than one longbeard show up, I talk gobbler talk with them, chucks and keeyelps. Those tell a bird that I'm not here to pick a fight and your welcome to join me. Those work well on birds that have been put in their place by a boss gobbler. The keeyelp is a gathering call that most gobblers use as they are getting together, great call to use later in the season or on roosted birds that are a bit shy. Your gobbler cutts, yelps, clucks, and keeyelps are all great calls to use, clucks and keeyelps are great calls to use on both gobblers and jakes.
WillowRidgeCalls
WI Youth & LTH Mentor
Dodge Co. NWTF
Scott

charlie elk
 
Posts: 1129
Joined: August 7th, 2009, 4:50 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby charlie elk » January 26th, 2014, 12:20 pm

In my humble opinion preconceived notions can be a turkey hunter's biggest obstacle to success. These prevent us from listening and feeling what the turkeys are telling us. Interpreting what is going on with turkeys is more like an art form than anything rules can be assigned to.

I have found in most areas temps and general weather have little influence on where turkeys roost (it does affect when they come off and go to roost). Unless the weather if very extreme requiring turkeys to take shelter, such as high wind, driving rain, blizzards, or spring time tornados. In these situations turkeys may even ground roost much like pheasants do.

In the WI section of this forum I wrote about one of my last 2013 turkeys that was killed after coming off a usual roost tree on a 25 below zero morning. viewtopic.php?f=86&t=19186 In case of these turkeys below zero temps did not change their roost tree selection.

Have you tried audio baiting turkeys? I wrote about this here- http://www.charlieelk.com/2013/how-to-legally-bait-wild-turkeys/ Seems like the Shaman land is tailor made for this, just sit on your deck with a cup and call away... Then walk out the next morning to work the gob you "parked."

Perhaps treerooster will take time here and share his experience with this strategy. He had never killed a turkey on his WI land until he audio baited the evening before.

In my opinion whether or not turkeys vocalize on any particular day has more to do with their changing flock structure than any outside influences.
later,
charlie
If you agree with me call it fact; if you disagree - call it my opinion.
After all - we are talking turkey.

User avatar
WillowRidgeCalls
 
Posts: 3514
Joined: May 25th, 2009, 4:26 pm
Location: Reeseville Wisconsin

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » January 26th, 2014, 12:40 pm

Dang charlie I forgot about that, yes it works fantastic, especially on small areas that birds like to roost off somewhere eles. It will draw them in at roost time and hold them overnight. ;)
WillowRidgeCalls
WI Youth & LTH Mentor
Dodge Co. NWTF
Scott

User avatar
shaman
 
Posts: 1015
Joined: June 30th, 2008, 12:35 am
Location: Neave, KY

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby shaman » January 26th, 2014, 1:16 pm

Audio baiting, huh? Now that's an idea not only worth trying, but easy to do as well. I often go out in the early evening to just walk around. I'll give it whirl and let y'all know.
Genesis 9:2-4 Ministries of SW Bracken County, KY
ImageImage

User avatar
Fan Club
 
Posts: 1368
Joined: April 13th, 2008, 5:24 am
Location: Calhoun County, Michigan

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby Fan Club » January 26th, 2014, 2:20 pm

Dammit... spent a considerable amount of time composing a contribution for this thread but when I hit submit it disappeared into thin air!

Apologies for the tone of my first post in months but I'm pissed. Arrrggh!!!

:oops:
"The joy of living is his, who has the heart to demand it." Teddy Roosevelt

User avatar
WillowRidgeCalls
 
Posts: 3514
Joined: May 25th, 2009, 4:26 pm
Location: Reeseville Wisconsin

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » January 26th, 2014, 4:09 pm

Fan Club wrote:Dammit... spent a considerable amount of time composing a contribution for this thread but when I hit submit it disappeared into thin air!

Apologies for the tone of my first post in months but I'm pissed. Arrrggh!!!

:oops:

If that happens Jeff, click your Back button it will take you back to your post, then click your refresh button and it will bring back up all your typing, then click submit and try to repost it again!!! Not sure why this site does that but it happens to me quite a bit, useally after you type a long post?
WillowRidgeCalls
WI Youth & LTH Mentor
Dodge Co. NWTF
Scott

User avatar
ads1
 
Posts: 204
Joined: February 18th, 2013, 6:11 pm
Location: South Eastern Illinois

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby ads1 » January 26th, 2014, 4:37 pm

You could copy your post onto your computer clipboard and have it there as backup. If you lose it on the forum, just bring the forum back up and paste it back in. :)
Image

timbrhuntr
 
Posts: 82
Joined: February 17th, 2013, 10:14 pm

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby timbrhuntr » January 26th, 2014, 5:47 pm

Audio baiting. That's funny when I used to hunt moose with a bow on some evenings we would go out at dark and call over the lake. It didn't always work but sometimes the next morning you would go there and call and get a response immediately from a bull that had come in overnight .

I actually did this one year for turkeys. I watched the group cross a field a couple of properties over to go to roost for 2 nights in a row. On the third night I went into the woods on the property I could hunt and made as much turkey noise as I could including making sounds to imitate birds flying up to roost. To my surprise even though most of the birds went off to the usual roost area several broke off and headed into the woods near where I was.Later I heard several fly up. I waited until dark and slipped out. I came back the next morning and had 3 toms answering me.

User avatar
Treerooster
 
Posts: 654
Joined: May 5th, 2008, 3:48 am
Location: Colorado

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby Treerooster » January 26th, 2014, 8:03 pm

charlie elk wrote:In my humble opinion preconceived notions can be a turkey hunter's biggest obstacle to success. These prevent us from listening and feeling what the turkeys are telling us. Interpreting what is going on with turkeys is more like an art form than anything rules can be assigned to.


I agree with this 100%. I know I am guilty of it and I think every hunter is too. I don't think it is possible NOT to have preconceived notions. However, the ability to think objectively, to be able to step away from what you do and think from a totally impartial view, is a big asset IMO. Think outside YOUR box in other words.


charlie elk wrote:Have you tried audio baiting turkeys? I wrote about this here- http://www.charlieelk.com/2013/how-to-legally-bait-wild-turkeys/ Seems like the Shaman land is tailor made for this, just sit on your deck with a cup and call away... Then walk out the next morning to work the gob you "parked."

Perhaps treerooster will take time here and share his experience with this strategy. He had never killed a turkey on his WI land until he audio baited the evening before.


I actually was successful twice on my place in Wis using this method. The first time I called in a couple of jakes and elected not to shoot them. Turkeys roost on the edge of my place but they fly up from the neighboring field and usually fly down to it in the morning.
The second time I tried this I had a bird gobbling so hot on the roost I couldn't believe it. I was even giggling a little bit. :D The gobbler roosted within 5 yards of the border on my place. But he knew a hot hen was around and he flew down to my side 10 minutes after shooting light the next morning. Pretty early in the late season and thick dark woods. I just made a couple of clucks and yelps and shot him at 15 yards. It was so thick I didn't even see him until about 18 yards but he was a drummin'.



charlie elk wrote:In my opinion whether or not turkeys vocalize on any particular day has more to do with their changing flock structure than any outside influences.


I think turkeys are influenced by a lot of things. Weather can do it, flock structure as Charlie says and also population dynamics which is a part of flock structure I guess. I am thinking flock structure changes with the seasons (winter, breeding, brood rearing etc.) and pop dynamics can change year to year (good hatch vs poor hatch and age/sex ratios, numbers of birds etc.).

Another influence on turkeys is recent events. Predator interaction (human & wild), other turkey interaction (a 2 year old just got beat up), food availability etc. Once I was zeroing in on a gobbler and I knew he had a hen with him in the morning. One afternoon I found a hen that had been hit by a vehicle in the area very recently. That gobbler was a sucker to call up the next morning...right close to where the hen got hit. Many events (most that we never know about) can influence turkey behavior IMO.

When I go to call to turkeys I am just flying by the seat of my pants. I try to figure out the mood the birds are in and what is going on at the moment, I am really only guessing, but the more experience I gain and the more observations I can make, the more I am making educated guesses.


Shaman I hesitated answering this post because you and I have VERY different situations. I hunt several areas that I am somewhat familiar with but they are public areas and are mostly measured in square miles...not acres. I never scout other than maybe the evening before an opening day. I do hunt some areas repeatedly so I am familiar with the land, but I never really know the turkey situation until I get there to hunt.

Here are some situations you mentioned in this post and how I might approach them.

On a roosted gobbler I am going to try and get within 60 to 70 yards if I possibly can otherwise I will get as close as the cover allows. If there are hens with him (usually the case) I will try to strike up a conversation with one of them...while they are in the trees. If I can't do that I want to be the first hen on the ground and try to get the gobbler or a hen to come join me. If I think the gobbler is alone I will play off his mood. I still may try to beat him to the ground though, it just depends. To just call subdued to a gobbler with hens is like throwing in the towel to me. Almost as if I am just sitting there hoping they come my way.

I don't believe a turkey (any turkey) has a day that it is unreceptive to calling. There may be some situations that I can't call up a turkey, but I wouldn't think the situation would last the whole day. If I call to turkeys and am unsuccessful (and that happens a lot) I figure I just wasn't calling the right way. That may mean loudness, the call I am using, what calls I make, or how excited/subdued I make them. I think any turkey can be called up any day of the year if I just use the right type of calling. Maybe I am wrong but if there are a few days a year a turkey can't be called up, those days are extremely rare IMO.
As far as this turkey thing......I know enough...to know enough...that I don't know enough

User avatar
shaman
 
Posts: 1015
Joined: June 30th, 2008, 12:35 am
Location: Neave, KY

Re: Is there a better way?

Postby shaman » January 27th, 2014, 9:08 am

On a roosted gobbler I am going to try and get within 60 to 70 yards if I possibly can otherwise I will get as close as the cover allows. If there are hens with him (usually the case) I will try to strike up a conversation with one of them...while they are in the trees. If I can't do that I want to be the first hen on the ground and try to get the gobbler or a hen to come join me. If I think the gobbler is alone I will play off his mood. I still may try to beat him to the ground though, it just depends. To just call subdued to a gobbler with hens is like throwing in the towel to me. Almost as if I am just sitting there hoping they come my way.


That was how I learned. That was how I did it for 20-some years. Then I popped a rib one spring doing chores around camp before season. I decided that it was not a good idea to go chasing the turkeys up and down the ridges and I resolved to stay on top and take it easy. I had good luck with it-- much better than I had in the past, and stuck with that strategy. In the past, I almost never had a gob come to me at flydown. However, hanging well back and uphill from the roost has improved my success. Since I changed strategies, I've actually had better luck at flydown. The gobs seem more eager to accept a new hen in the woods if she seems a bit farther away. It also gives me room to relocate and close the distance. If I start out at Venue A and B and C are closer to the roost, I've had luck by starting at A, simulating a flydown there, and when the gob starts honoring my calls, I relocate to B. If he passes me up, I go to C and he turns around and he may come back my way. The nice thing about these knife-edge ridges is I can drop down the back side of the ridge and move while still being invisible to gobblers on the other side. This sounds like a lot of moving around for an old fat man, but we're talking 500 yards max and there are pastures and old truck tracks, and this dance may be played out over 3 hours. Overall it has improved my luck over the old way of starting at the bottom of the hill near the roost trees, and then clomping around going uphill all morning.

You also have to remember the 200 acre limitation. If you are going to be playing the same flocks every time you go out, you have to be a bit more subtle. This is much more of a chess game. What you are calling "throwing in the towel" is strategy. That gob knows there is a flock of lonely hens up on top of the ridge. He'll eventually get done with his hens and be wanting some action. Along about 9 or 10, I'll throw out a few yelps and possibly a cutt or two and now he's ready. I'm not saying this is the right way, but it is the way I've adopted that seems to get birds.
Genesis 9:2-4 Ministries of SW Bracken County, KY
ImageImage

PreviousNext

Return to Talkin' Turkey • General discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Majestic-12 [Bot] and 11 guests