Cool Sighting

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WillowRidgeCalls
 
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Cool Sighting

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » October 25th, 2013, 12:52 pm

This would be a cool sighting for any bowhunter. He's been on scoot's trail cams for the passed couple of weeks, and was standing in front of scoot sunday night at 10 yards. More pics in the Trail Cam section of him.
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Scoot's albino3.jpg
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Last edited by WillowRidgeCalls on October 29th, 2013, 8:49 pm, edited 2 times in total.
WillowRidgeCalls
WI Youth & LTH Mentor
Dodge Co. NWTF
Scott

misoiltester
 
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Re: Cool Sighting

Postby misoiltester » October 25th, 2013, 1:54 pm

Sweet Lookin'!! :D

One of my old clients in Michigan, had gotton a nice "Bald Plate"??(I think that's what they called it), a few years back. While I was soil testing his farm ground that year, I found 1 antler shed of one .. that I left his dad to give to him!! Definately a different find ;)
Ever wonder where the white goes when the snow melts????

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WillowRidgeCalls
 
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Re: Cool Sighting

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » October 29th, 2013, 8:46 pm

This little fellow is making history. He turns out to be the first ever proven true albino in Grant Co.
WillowRidgeCalls
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Dodge Co. NWTF
Scott

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WillowRidgeCalls
 
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Re: Cool Sighting

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » November 1st, 2013, 9:03 pm

Talked to Scoot again today about the albino. The DRN called him again and asked again if he's been seeing the little buck around lately? They also told him that if he desides to take him, he better take him this year. This will be the last year that a albino will be able to be taken in the state of WI. A bill has already been passed through the congress not allowing any abino's or white deer to be taken in the state, no matter what unit your in, no white deer period!!! Another bowhunter about a half mile down the road has been seeing him chasing doe on a farm they hunt. The farmer told him to leave it be, it was born on his farm and it will die on his farm from old age, or a car? At least Scoot found out where he came from and where he lives, and had already desided not to take him because of the rarity of the animal.
WillowRidgeCalls
WI Youth & LTH Mentor
Dodge Co. NWTF
Scott

gouldshunter
 
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Re: Cool Sighting

Postby gouldshunter » November 5th, 2013, 7:29 pm

That is cool keep us updated. whoever takes this one should do a full body mount on a once in a lifetime trophy.

misoiltester
 
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Re: Cool Sighting

Postby misoiltester » November 6th, 2013, 7:09 am

Interesting on that lil' white ones history!! Gotta respect the neighbors wishes ;)
Ever wonder where the white goes when the snow melts????

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Cut N Run
 
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Re: Cool Sighting

Postby Cut N Run » November 6th, 2013, 4:50 pm

I used to hunt a man's land in Chatham County, NC about 30 years ago that had a white doe. The man who owned the land would only give permission to hunt as long as you let the white deer pass. He also gave permission to let a high school neighbor boy to hunt there with the same condition. That fool killed the white doe and the old man closed off hunting access to everybody.

____________________________________________________________________________

In 1998 I used to live and work at a breeding compound for third world endangered carnivores (Tigers, Leopards, Jaguars, Ocelots, Servals, Caracals, Lynx, etc.). On my 28th birthday, on December 18th, a woman called us about a white deer that she and a friend had rescued out of Jordan Lake. A pack of dogs had chased it into the lake and wouldn't let it come back to shore. It was getting exhausted swimming in circles in the freezing water. The women got an inflatable raft, blew it up, broke the ice at the shore, paddled out to the middle of the lake in December, and hauled the deer back to shore. They took it to a horse barn where it was in shock and shivering badly. Initially, she called the Wildlife department and they told her to let nature take its course and whatever happens, happens. They said that their department was about wildlife management, enforcement, and protection, but were not doing rehabilitation. Next, they called the forestry people, who told her that they were all about trees, not deer, and that the women should call the Wildlife department. Because we rescued animals of many types, they called us next. The director asked me to go check the deer out and if it was injured, to take it off site, away from the women and finish it. If it was healthy, then I'd bring it back to the compound where we could give it a place to recover.

The doe didn't look good when I got there because she wouldn't stand and was shivering uncontrollably. I lifted up her front end and put her weight on her hind legs to make sure she wasn't paralyzed. She was able to drive off her hind legs, but she had no balance because of her shivering. We strapped her hind legs to her front legs so she couldn't kick, and I held her in the back seat of an Isuzu Trooper as we made the 18 mile drive back to the compound. I took her inside the house and laid her down on my sleeping bag beside the wood stove, where it was warm. I went outside to gather up a big bunch of honeysuckle off the fence for her to eat. She would not get up, but was more relaxed and not shivering anymore. She let me scratch her neck at the base of her head and she seemed to enjoy it. We named her Jane Doe.

About 6:30 P.M. we got a call that somebody down the road had hit a screech owl with their car and wondered if we could help it. They brought it to us in a shoebox. I half expected it to be pulpy mess of bloody matted feathers that barely resembled an owl. I brought it in the house and when I opened the shoe box and it was unconscious. I stroked the owl's head a few times, the little owl opened his eyes, flew out of the box, straight up the stairwell to the second floor, barely missing the spinning ceiling fan. Since it was low light up there, I left the owl alone and back went over to the deer. She wouldn't eat apples, because she may not have ever seen any before. She hit that honeysuckle like a mower though. I had brought in about 3/4ths of a bushel basket of honeysuckle and the deer ate most of it. A little after midnight I went to bed. At around 2:30 AM I woke to the sound of the deer's hooves clicking on the tile floor of the kitchen as she was walking around checking things out. I opened my bedroom door, and the owl was sitting on the phone desk mounted to the wall just outside the door to my room. It whipped it's head around, but didn't fly off. I eased down the stairs and sat down on the bottom step. The deer walked over to me and I leaned back to look at the owl that was looking down the stairs at me. It was an odd but very cool feeling having two wild animals inside the house that were calmly riding out the cold night. I ran a bowl of water for the deer and she drank quite a bit of it. She looked alert and would check out every sound she heard. I knew she would survive. Before dawn, I caught the owl, put it back in the shoe box, and turned the owl loose back near the back of the property where there was hundreds of acres for it to hang out. It had been struck by the car less than a mile down the road from the compound, so I'm sure it went back to its normal range.

The next morning, I carried the deer out to the compound where the big cats were and turned her loose. There were some other wild deer that also lived inside the compound full time. She trotted towards where they were grazing at the edge of the woods, but they shied away and went to cover (probably had never seen a white deer before). I'm sure Jane Doe smelled like the sleeping bag, the house, and fireplace, so I can't blame the other deer from not wanting to hang out with Jane. The tigers, jaguars, and leopards were going nuts trying to get at that white doe, but she stayed away from any of their compounds and wandered the strips of woods near the perimeter fence. Like the other deer, she headed for cover. The next day that white deer would only come to me or allow me to touch her. The following day, we released her on a friend of mine's property about 15 miles away with over 1,300 acres to safely roam. He also put the word out in their community that the white deer was off limits and anybody who killed her was next. The next spring, she had twin white fawns and to this day, 25 years later, they see white deer in that area regularly.

I know I have some pictures of her that I'll have to find, scan, and post here. It was one of the most memorable birthdays I ever had.

Jim
Luck Counts, good or bad

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dewey
 
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Re: Cool Sighting

Postby dewey » November 6th, 2013, 5:36 pm

That is an incredible story Jim. Amazing experience for sure. Thank you for sharing.

Dewey
"Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will." --Mahatma Gandhi

"Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat."--F. Scott Fitzgerald, American writer

       

misoiltester
 
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Re: Cool Sighting

Postby misoiltester » November 6th, 2013, 6:40 pm

Jim,
That's quite a time you had there, and it sure sounds like you're kinda like, "daddy nature", around the wild critters ;)

Look the pics. up, as I'm sure everyone will enjoy seeing them and any thing wild, that was nurtered by you, and released back into the habitat, that was large enough to substain their presence :)

My experience in Michigan, was less desirable .. and doesn't need repeating :roll:
Ever wonder where the white goes when the snow melts????

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Cut N Run
 
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Location: central North Carolina

Re: Cool Sighting

Postby Cut N Run » November 7th, 2013, 8:12 am

I haven't had time to find those pictures yet, but I'll look for them today.

Some of my friends used to call me Dr. Wildlife because I spend so much time around wild animals.
Here's a video I took in my backyard that is zoomed in too close. I've been feeding this herd for just over 20 years.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uy4syyIyR3M

Jim
Luck Counts, good or bad

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