Turning strikers

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WillowRidgeCalls
 
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Re: Turning strikers

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » August 27th, 2013, 9:30 am

kygobbler wrote:Great info guys. I have never really thought about the weight of a striker. I thought it dealt more to the density as in soft wood compared to hard wood. I also just figured some woods play better than others. So if your making a striker what is the ideal weight that you would want it? I know each wood weighs different so I'm just going to make up some numbers for example. Do you want them to weigh between 10-15 grams.

It somewhat depends on how you play a pot call, if you play more aggressively you can get by with a lighter striker, because your putting more pressure down on that striker, if you play more softly your better off with a little heavier striker so the striker performs up it's top ability to get your best sound and make the call play easier.
In grams = 18.0 _ 33.0
In oz = .634 _ 1.164
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Re: Turning strikers

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » August 27th, 2013, 10:15 pm

Now that your learning about how weight plays a huge part in strikers. I'm going to test you guys, and throw you a curve. If you turned two strikers out of the same wood, lets just use the shape of a two piece striker. If you turned one striker that same exact shape, and the other with a reverse cone to the top, both would weigh exactly the same, would they sound the same?
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Re: Turning strikers

Postby kygobbler » August 28th, 2013, 6:47 am

I don't believe I've ever seen a striker with a reversed cone so Im not to sure on how it would play. I would guess since the weight is not evenly balanced it would have a different sound to it unless you could hold it differently to adjust the balance.

Now because you said it was a curve ball, Im guessing that it would play the same but Im thinking the reversed cone would have a different vibration to it.
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Re: Turning strikers

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » August 28th, 2013, 8:29 am

Your right Bryan, it would play but it would,'t sound worth a dang. It goes back to what Ted said about Vibrational Inertia, vibration travels threw wood to it's widest point and stops. With the widest point being on the bottom of your counter balance, your sound would only travel to the widest point, the rest of the wood is just like dead weight. That's one of the problems with fancy turned strikers that have a lot of different shapes cut into them. Look at it just like a Hammer, the weight is exactly the same no matter how you pick it up, but if you held the hammer at the end of the handle and pounded a nail in it would only take you 3 hits, but if you held the hammer by it's head and pounded a nail in it would take you 35 hits to drive that nail in, even though you still have the same weight, but the handle is just dead weight. A striker is just like a hammer, the vibrations travel up the wood to it's widest point, so you want it's widest point at the top to get as much sound out of it and to make it play it's best. You'll get vibration to travel all the way to the top, but you'll keep loosing vibration all the way up, instead of gaining vibration all the way up, so your sound softens as it goes up because it only has a small skinny peg to follow to the top.
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Re: Turning strikers

Postby Steve_In » August 30th, 2013, 12:00 pm

OK Scott I have been thinking about this and my manufacturing CNC programming side kicked in. Since the the weight per cubic inch of wood is easy to find from several sources and strikers are generally made to the same basic configuration it would seem the information could be plugged into a simple spreadsheet and you would have the ideal dimensions for any striker wood. Since most of the shaft lengths and diameters seem consistent the weight of this portion would be a snap to calculate. With this known and the length of the barrel portion constant the diameter could be calculated either as a straight shaft of a taper. I am assuming there is a tolerance that would allow for some variance in wood density. HMMMM? :idea: ? :!: ? :!: :!: I wonder how much wood chips would gum up the inside of one of our CNC lathes at work? :D
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Re: Turning strikers

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » August 30th, 2013, 4:07 pm

Your dead on Steve, guys that are good on a lathe can adjust the diameter size of the tops and come very close to what it should be. As long as you have an idea of what the wood weights are is pretty simple as long as your striker design is an easy design.
When I first started doing this I just used a teeter toter effect. I had a 12" rule that I used a pencil at 6" and balanced it. Then I set a walnut block on 12" end and a purpleheart block on the 0 end, and moved the purpleheart block up until it balanced. It was at just over 3" which told me that the purpleheart was just over twice the weight of the walnut and gave me a starting point of what the diameter would be. I've always use walnut tops on my two piece strikers, so that's why I chose a walnut block for a starting weight.

A CNC is what the production folks use, and most use a laminate wood, so the weight is all the same, you can use any color you want. They are all a laminated birch product, laminates, dymondwood, all the same product, just the resins and the wood tolerances are different. So once to have a design you want to use, they just put the weight, length, diameter sizes into a cadd program on a CNC and let it go, all you have to do is supply the wood.
Your CNC would work fine as long as it had a good air suction to suck up the chips.
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Re: Turning strikers

Postby Steve_In » August 30th, 2013, 4:26 pm

The machine would do the job, but the coolant all over the cabinet would be a mess. The barfeeder on the one machine would hold about 15 48" dowels. Push the green button and let it fly. I will play with Excel and see what I can come up with.
These tricks would really benefit a custom call maker as he would not have to play with strikers until they sound right.
Another thing when I see several strikers that are all the same size by being able to guess the weight I may make a better choice of wood.
Steve, I love "smoked" turkey

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Re: Turning strikers

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » September 2nd, 2013, 9:03 am

One thing you try to do on the CNC Steve is try to make a good water proof striker out of alum. or acrylic and a few bone pieces, all would work and the coolant shouldn't bother them much. You could clean them up after with acetone to get rid of the coolant? If you could turn the coolant off and run it without, then you could use wood.
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Re: Turning strikers

Postby Steve_In » September 2nd, 2013, 12:32 pm

M8 turns coolant on M9 turns it off. The problem would be the dust getting into the filtration system and plugging it up. The Boss would not be happy with that. Camo dipped aluminum with a bead blasted tip? What surface would it play on?
Steve, I love "smoked" turkey

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Re: Turning strikers

Postby kygobbler » September 2nd, 2013, 3:30 pm

Since talking about strikers and everything, I have a old school question? How can you turn a wingbone into a good striker? No matter what I tried I could never get one to sound good. Do you need to fill the bone with something to get the weight right?
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