The Real Mating Call

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greyghost
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby greyghost » February 19th, 2009, 1:15 am

I have read where a turkey may be able to hear it for a mile maybe even further. Will have to get back since I can't off the top of my head remember the exact books. I think Williams has it in his book Voice and Vocabulary of the Wild Turkey. Will ckeck and get back with you all.
 
A couple here said they use it and is an effective tool for taking gobblers. I admit I am slow but if the gobbler is using it as a mating call and the hens go to it which a couple folks posted, then why would another gobbler go to it? If the gobble is the challenging call and signalling hens their location are other gobblers going to the spit and drum to fight?
 
I generaly use a cluck to get them out of a strut, never thought of using the S&D. 
 
I have tried those game ears and a couple others, I actually do better with out them since for me I can not get a good direction of the sound, it is distorted for me.

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Cut N Run
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby Cut N Run » February 19th, 2009, 8:37 am

TC, I misinterpreted what you said. Please accept my apologies.  I did not realize your post was an addendum to mine, not a critique.
 
Far as the "Boss is gone, Let's get it on" that does take a while for the remaining Gobblers to sort things out.  It usually takes a few days for birds to realize the Boss is even missing. For all they know, he is off tending a hen the next ridge over. We have taken the Boss before on a Saturday and by the next Friday, there were more Gobblers calling than before.
 
I have witnessed the Boss chasing subordinate gobblers off, looking to kick their butts in the Fall as well as in Winter. To stay at the top of the heap, they have to reinforce dominance any chance they get. Agreed that dynamics of the flock ase established in Winter, not Spring. Spring is a bit of a free-for-all where if a willing hen is at stake, the dominant Gobbler present will take the opportunity to breed.
 
 
Jim
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swpatrkyhunter
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby swpatrkyhunter » February 19th, 2009, 9:02 am

I think the fact that Turkeys can pinpoint your EXACT location with your first call would explain them being able to hear drumming from a long distance.
If it gobbles,runs on gas, or is married to you it will give you trouble!

swpatrkyhunter
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby swpatrkyhunter » February 19th, 2009, 9:39 am

I will admit that I am not as well read on Turkeys as most of you are. So with that in mind does'nt anybody know of any books on this? Surly somebody has had to note the same idea at one time or another. I mean it does make sense!
If it gobbles,runs on gas, or is married to you it will give you trouble!

swpatrkyhunter
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby swpatrkyhunter » February 19th, 2009, 10:06 am

Is there a way to mimic the drumming? I'm sure somekind of study would have to be done to find the right frequecy to get it right. Or has one been done?
If it gobbles,runs on gas, or is married to you it will give you trouble!

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Cut N Run
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby Cut N Run » February 19th, 2009, 10:23 am

Studying drumming calls would certainly be interesting and worth investigating. Kind of hard to imagine that in-depth studies have not already been done.
 
 In 1989, I met a Costa Rican woman at Tikal, in Peten, Guatemala who had secured grants from the NWTF and Wild Turkey Burbon to study habits of the Oscellated Turkey toward her doctor's degree.  The money for similar research done in the U.S. is bound to be there. I'm going to see what I can turn up on the subject.
 
Jim
 
 
Luck Counts, good or bad

swpatrkyhunter
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby swpatrkyhunter » February 19th, 2009, 10:41 am

Maybe the magazines Biologist Lovett E. Williams Jr. has some information on this! Be a good topic for him to explore I think. And now I'm curious if the differant species or Turkey would have a differant frequency. probably not but you never know.
If it gobbles,runs on gas, or is married to you it will give you trouble!

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dmcianfa
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby dmcianfa » February 20th, 2009, 5:26 am

I hate to break it to everyone here, but after studying vibrations as an engineer for years, lower frequency sounds DO NOT travel farther than higher frequency sounds.  At least it does not have a direct relationship on it.  This is a common misnomer.  Distance a sound wave travels is a function of the amount of energy(work) and therefore intensity (amplitude) of the sound wave, not the frequency.  In a controlled and steady state environment, frequency has no bearing on the amount a sound wave travels through a controlled medium (air, water, etc..).  However, lower frequencies are more "capable" of bending and/or penetrating obstacles than higher frequencies.  It all depends on how many and how large obstacles are between you and the source or origin of the sound.  That sound you hear from the youngin's car from a mile away you think is because of the low frequency (bass), but in fact is a direct result of the intensity of the sound waves measured in (db); not Hertz,the measure of frequency.  ENERGY, ENERGY, ENERGY.  Think of light, heat and sound. As the more energy the source emits, the farther away you can see, feel, and hear it respectively.  I can directly quote a physics text of mine if need be.

So, what does this mean?  A turkey making a spit and drumming sound may in fact be at a lower frequency, but it will not travel as far as a gobble because the bird puts more "work" into the gobble than the spit and drum.  If one could measure the amount of calories (energy) a bird burns during each activity (gobble and drum), you could determine, which sound will travel farther because energy is always conserved (Newton's second law). Or you could measure the amplitude of the sound waves emitted, which would be much easier I suppose.  I would be very, very astonished if you could hear a spit and drum from miles away.  That is frankly a falsehood IMO and should never even be discussed, as the intesity is much too small to travel that measure of distance. Now, using it as a call at short ranges may be effective, but probably only if a gobbler is hanging just out of range and absolutely nothing else is working to get him to within shooting distance.  I'm guessing it will have a similar effect as a gobble call, meaning it could pi#$ a bird off enough to come runnin' in and challenge or send him runnin' for the hills in fear of an arse kickin'.   I'm not sure as I've never tried it before on a bird to know the reactions it would bring in different situations.    
"After eating an entire moose, a mountain lion felt so good he started roaring. He kept it up until a hunter came along and shot him. The moral: When you're full of bull, keep your mouth shut."

greyghost
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby greyghost » February 21st, 2009, 12:53 am

ORIGINAL: greyghost

I have read where a turkey may be able to hear it for a mile maybe even further. Will have to get back since I can't off the top of my head remember the exact books. I think Williams has it in his book Voice and Vocabulary of the Wild Turkey. Will ckeck and get back with you all.




Sorry, took a little time going through a couple of the books. First William's book 'Voice and Vocabulary' had very little about it. The others only covered a little more detailed study's but not so much along the lines of distance that a turkey can hear drumming. They did say that the human ear on still days may be able to hear it 40-50 yards at most.

I know I read it somewhere but will continue to research to see how far or if any serious studies have been done on it. It looks right now that no real indepth study has been done.

TC I read the same on High and Low frequency sounds while searching for drumming. I am a little confused on it myself[:@]. I did understand the sound waves part travling through water vs air though. [:)]
 
Shoot, got to run and go listen for the birdies. 

deja vu
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby deja vu » February 21st, 2009, 10:40 am

I remember reading somewhere some time ago about the drumming being the "breeding call"  they stated that the sound could be heard over longer distances. Not sure who it was that wrote it, and maybe they had no study or fact to back it up, it could have been just another opinion.

dmcianfa stated in his experience studying vibration and the physics that support it.....
However, lower frequencies are more "capable" of bending and/or penetrating obstacles than higher frequencies. It all depends on how many and how large obstacles are between you and the source or origin of the sound. 

How about this thought.... maybe the lower frequencies travel farther in the woods where there are many obstacles to bend and penetrate??? That would support the thinking that the drumming could be heard farther wouldn`t it? That is if it started out with enough energy , and I am not sure that the gobble requires more energy that the drumming, I have watched them drum and because it`s not as loud dosen`t necessarily mean less energy. If I toss a big rock does it take more energy than to carry it the same distance traveled? I have no idea... there must be a formula somewhere.....
"Old School Elitist"

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