How deep and how steep...???

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GearJammer
 
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How deep and how steep...???

Postby GearJammer » February 16th, 2009, 9:18 am

  Hey guys! Hope everyone has a great spring season! I was having a discussion with a buddy in Tennessee the other day about spring turkey hunting in the snow and in the hills/mountains. When he asked me if I hunted in the snow, I said absolutely! He went on to tell me that he didn't think turkey would move around in the snow, especially if it was real deep. Now, I have seen turkey in snow that is about 3 or 4 inches deep. So...my first question is this: How deep of snow have you ever seen turkey?
   Next. We then began to talk about elevation, degree of climbing etc. Again, my friend didn't think that turkey would feed, mate, etc on the side of a hill at an angle. I told him that I have seen them in my area on angles of up to 30 degrees. He didn't believe me but regardless I have! So...my second question: Have you observed turkey on inclines and hillsides or just on more flat areas?
  Thanks for the replies!
 
"The doorway to freedom is framed in muskets" Charleton Heston

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dmcianfa
 
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RE: How deep and how steep...???

Postby dmcianfa » February 16th, 2009, 9:50 am

I have seen turkey's on the face of about a 60 degree incline feeding on acorns.  That is pretty steep in my opinion.  It doesn't get much more steep than that where I'm from, but nothings impossible with these birds.  If there was a dynamite food source on a shelf on the face of a cliff, I wouldn't doubt they would fly to it and eat on that as well.  The lore and myths that turkeys won't navigate a ridge one way or the other, cross a creek or river, jump a fence is all bull in my experience, but then again maybe it's got some relevence to it.   I think some people use it as an excuse however, because they couldn't get the bird to come to them for some reason.  Couldn't be their calling right?  LOL[:D]
"After eating an entire moose, a mountain lion felt so good he started roaring. He kept it up until a hunter came along and shot him. The moral: When you're full of bull, keep your mouth shut."

wisturkeyhunter
 
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RE: How deep and how steep...???

Postby wisturkeyhunter » February 16th, 2009, 11:38 am

I've seen turkeys walking in snow that was above my waste.

greyghost
 
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RE: How deep and how steep...???

Postby greyghost » February 16th, 2009, 12:11 pm

Can't say much on the snow walking here as we do not get that much anymore. But 3 or 4 inches here I have seen a few times turkey's walking around.
 
Hillsides seen a lot of feeding and walking activity. A lot of times they hit the benches in the mountains and they follow those. One turkey and I still do not believe it came up a 100 foot hill that was say about 75 degree sincline.

Ozarks Hillbilly
 
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RE: How deep and how steep...???

Postby Ozarks Hillbilly » February 16th, 2009, 12:14 pm

I guess through evolution are Turkeys have developed one leg that is longer than the other from side hillin so much. [;)]
These Ozark Mountains Ain't High But The Hollers Sure Are Deep

trkyklr
 
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RE: How deep and how steep...???

Postby trkyklr » February 16th, 2009, 12:14 pm

i've seen birds walk up bluffs, dang near straight up!   i've also witnessed them walk straight down(dang near)sideways like a human would to get traction.

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tracebusta32
 
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RE: How deep and how steep...???

Postby tracebusta32 » February 16th, 2009, 12:55 pm

Snowfall affects wild turkeys by limiting their movements and blocking their access to food sources. During such severe conditions, turkeys may be lost to starvation. Weakened birds are also more susceptible to predation. However, if food is available, turkeys can withstand very cold temperatures. Wild turkeys in good condition can usually survive up to 2 weeks before a significant number die. 
 
The effect of snow includes not only the snow's depth, and the length of time it is on the ground, but also its condition. Fluffy powdered snow is more limiting to turkeys than crusted snow. Although turkeys cannot dig through snow deeper than about 6 inches, they also cannot walk any distance through snow deeper than 1 foot. If powdery snow prevails, turkeys may remain on the roost until it crusts or melts, but, with crusted snow, they may be able to walk to above-ground food sources.
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swpatrkyhunter
 
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RE: How deep and how steep...???

Postby swpatrkyhunter » February 16th, 2009, 1:36 pm

I have seen Turkeys in around 6 inches of snow. But no matter how deep it is I'm sure they will do the best they can to look for food. As for how steep! I have seen turkeys feeding on hillsides that were almost straight up! I thought it was odd but go figure! But I have only seen them mate in more flater areas.

wisturkeyhunter
 
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RE: How deep and how steep...???

Postby wisturkeyhunter » February 16th, 2009, 3:17 pm

In the upper midwest we have deep snow and cold temps for months straight and the turkey numbers keep rising. They can adapt way better than they are given credit. If 2 weeks of cold killed a large number they would not be living here.

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tracebusta32
 
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RE: How deep and how steep...???

Postby tracebusta32 » February 16th, 2009, 3:44 pm

Wild turkeys in Wisconsin are tough birds. From historical records, A. W. Schorger traced the expansion and contraction of the northern limits of turkey range in Wisconsin during the 1800's in response to winter weather. This environmental tug-of-war can be seen today where turkeys have been reestablished, which is well past the northern limits of their ancestral range. Research on wild turkeys in Pennsylvania and New York (where winter severity is somewhat close to Wisconsin's) has shown that some turkeys will in fact starve during winters when powdery, deep snow cover the ground for a period of several weeks. But they found that wild turkeys populations can recover in one breeding season and the overall population health and trend is more dependent on the previous summer's reproductive success than winter survival. The average survival of wild turkeys over mild or average winters ranges from 70 to nearly 100%, but severe winters can reduce this survival rate to 55-60% which is still more than enough to provide breeding stock for the next year
Malachi 4:5-6
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