Techniques

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shaman
 
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RE: Techniques

Postby shaman » February 12th, 2009, 5:34 am

ORIGINAL: trkynut54

 Say you have a gobbler answering every call you throw at him but he doesn't budge an inch. What do you do?



I've got several birds that have spent whole seasons not budging an inch from some bastion, usually just off my property.  I think part of it is the barrier thing. Some are across a creek. Some are across a fence. That will certainly cause a gobbler not to come.  Henned up gobs will do the same thing.  I have one gob that stays on top of a little hill and gobbles 4 seasons of the year. He's only 100-200 yards off my property, but he'd sooner pull his own head off as to come to one of my calls. Honor them? yes. Come? No way.

However, I want to address the nature of the question:  I would say the question itself begs the answer of: "You're overcalling, and it's time to shut up and do something different."

If it really is a barrier, then you have to figure out how to get on the other side of the barrier. When you get over that barrier, I wouldn't be throwing the same call at the gob.  Otherwise he will think you're coming to him and just sit there and wait.

If it is a flock of hens that have him henned up, you're going to have to figure out where the flock is going and head them off.

Most turkeys I've killed that I could watch from a distance will stop each time I call and go into a strut. The longer I keep calling, the longer it takes them to get in.  The turkey I called from the longest distance away came from hundreds of yards with only a yelp now and again from my  box-- about every 10 minutes or so.  If you have a gob that stays put yet honors your every call-- he ain't coming. At least not while you're calling.
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turkeydoghunter
 
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RE: Techniques

Postby turkeydoghunter » February 12th, 2009, 8:36 am

i called three long beards across a deep wide river...killed one ....went back the next day same senario....they wouldnt cross it.....if only i had me boat [:D]

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trkynut54
 
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RE: Techniques

Postby trkynut54 » February 12th, 2009, 3:46 pm

ORIGINAL: shaman

ORIGINAL: trkynut54

Say you have a gobbler answering every call you throw at him but he doesn't budge an inch. What do you do?



I've got several birds that have spent whole seasons not budging an inch from some bastion, usually just off my property.  I think part of it is the barrier thing. Some are across a creek. Some are across a fence. That will certainly cause a gobbler not to come.  Henned up gobs will do the same thing.  I have one gob that stays on top of a little hill and gobbles 4 seasons of the year. He's only 100-200 yards off my property, but he'd sooner pull his own head off as to come to one of my calls. Honor them? yes. Come? No way.

However, I want to address the nature of the question:  I would say the question itself begs the answer of: "You're overcalling, and it's time to shut up and do something different."

If it really is a barrier, then you have to figure out how to get on the other side of the barrier. When you get over that barrier, I wouldn't be throwing the same call at the gob.  Otherwise he will think you're coming to him and just sit there and wait.

If it is a flock of hens that have him henned up, you're going to have to figure out where the flock is going and head them off.

Most turkeys I've killed that I could watch from a distance will stop each time I call and go into a strut. The longer I keep calling, the longer it takes them to get in.  The turkey I called from the longest distance away came from hundreds of yards with only a yelp now and again from my  box-- about every 10 minutes or so.  If you have a gob that stays put yet honors your every call-- he ain't coming. At least not while you're calling.



I found out the hard way one year. But it was a good lesson I learned. It was the next to the last day of my vacation. I didn't hear any gobbling since the first day of the season. I went to a different area to scout but I knew there were turkeys there but never hunted it. I parked along the road and walked down across some benches in open timber. It was mostly White and Red Oaks. I came upon some fresh scratchings from that morning around the base of a tree. I'm thinking to myself, Gobbler scratchings. I walked out along the bench towards a clearcut and called every 30 yards or so. Finally I heard a gobble out from me. I quickly set up and started calling.


He answered every call with gobbling but he wasn't coming closer. Then a flock of crows came and made such a ruckus I couldn't hardly hear him gobbling. Then when everything went silent I called and never heard another peep out of him. So I got up and walked over to where I heard him and there was an uprooted tree laying on the ground. No wonder he wouldn't come in. We had a bad storm before the season that uprooted alot of trees.

So I decided to go there the next morning, the last day of vacation. I got there as the sky was getting light and I settled into a Hemlock where I heard him last. I knew where he would roost, on that White Oak I saw the previous day. It finally got daylight and no gobbles. I started to think he wasn't there so I started yelping. Then he gobbled. I called again and he answered back. He was on the other side of that blowdown. I was at the root end of it. Every call I made he gobbled. I cackled and he double gobbled. So finally I just quit calling altogether. I got my gun up and waited. About ten minutes later he came around the root end and started walking towards me at an angle. As soon as he got into the open and stretched his neck up BOOM down he went. About a 30 yard shot.
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RE: Techniques

Postby SamuraiTater » February 12th, 2009, 7:37 pm

As a last resort I like to tear it up briefly with fighting purs from a slate and a diaphram simultneously.  ....And if that don't work, I might throw a hen decoy out there and put on some swanky porno music for him. [;)]

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shaman
 
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RE: Techniques

Postby shaman » February 14th, 2009, 4:25 am

ORIGINAL: TurkeyComander

If a turkey wants to come...there is no such thing as a barrier.


Yes, but if he's only half-hearted, any excuse will do. I've seen gobblers hang up at creeks,  hang up at a fence, hang up on the edge of clearing. Then again, I've seen turkeys cross the same.     Sometimes it's nothing more than the margin between the shadows  and the  sunlit part of a field.  In my experience, 50% of the time there  are hens involved, or hens plus a rival suitor. 

I had an experience last Spring, where I watched a flock of hens in the afternoon with two gobblers. I was in a small copse of trees about 250 yards from an oak grove.  The one gobbler couldn't get enough of my calls, and kept breaking away.  He'd get about 20 yards from the oak grove into open pasture  and then he'd look back at his buddy in full strut and come running back.  You could tell the hens were disinterested and just feeding.  You could tell the one gob was really fired up-- walking all over my calls, but his rival was keeping him there.  If all I had been able to see was the one gobbler, I'd have been sure he had a string attached to him, yanking him back every time he left the tree line.

My point is this:  it's important to realize when it is time to do something else besides just trying another call. Second:  when I move, I usually change up my call somewhat so the gobbler does not get the idea I'm the same hen coming to him. The exception to this is when I get up and move away from the gobbler-- something that's been suggested by others-- then I want him to think I've become disinterested and walking away.

BTW: my solution to that situation was to get on the back side of the pasture and do a stalk to a second copse that was only 60 yards or so from the flock.  It took me a while and when I got there and got set up, the hens were in the process of moving out of the grove and into some cedars even further away.  I was in a really bum position, laying amongst blackberries, and when I brought my gun up, the gobblers decided to scram.
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turkaholic
 
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RE: Techniques

Postby turkaholic » February 14th, 2009, 4:30 pm

I like to use the calls that bug um out. I scratch leaves and drag my turkey wing on the tree bark. Let them know your there without calling. I sometimes will do my best impression of a spit and drum. If that don't work try repositioning.
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shaman
 
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RE: Techniques

Postby shaman » February 16th, 2009, 7:17 am

ORIGINAL: TurkeyComander

If he's half hearted it's because you ain't convinced him you are the real thing....


That would be one of at least several reasons I can think of.    I doubt it would be the only. 
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dmcianfa
 
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RE: Techniques

Postby dmcianfa » February 16th, 2009, 8:49 am

I would probably not yelp or cut anymore and would soft purr with some scratching.  If that didn't get him then I would come back the next day and setup as close to the last spot I heard or saw him as possible.  That is only if I couldn't cut him off somewhere I knew he was going the previous day.  If I couldn't get to his last spot due to property lines or some other obstruction, then I may set some decoys out as well the next day in the closest possible spot and do some mad cutting and throw a jake gobble at him with my tube if he's hung up.  That will usually do one of two things.  Urk him off enough to come and ward off the intruder or spook him to the point he boogies the other way and never answers another call the rest of the season.  That's hunting I guess.  I've had about 50/50 success with my gobble tube as a last resort.  Some birds like it, some don't.  Guess it all depends on what mood he's in or if he's the dominant raptor in the flock.  Hope that helps some!
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RutnNStrutn
 
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RE: Techniques

Postby RutnNStrutn » February 16th, 2009, 10:10 pm

ORIGINAL: turkeydoghunter
i like to tone down my calling to feeding clucks and purrs ....do some scatching

Exactly tdh!!!  I know several turkey hunters who have killed birds without uttering a sound, and have simply scratched leaves.  The successful turkey hunters I know use the silent treatment, but only as a last resort when nothing else works.  The silent treatment can work for you in some situations, but it can also lead to a gobbler getting bored and walking away.
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shaman
 
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RE: Techniques

Postby shaman » February 17th, 2009, 4:06 am

ORIGINAL: TurkeyComander

ORIGINAL: shaman

ORIGINAL: TurkeyComander

If he's half hearted it's because you ain't convinced him you are the real thing....


That would be one of at least several reasons I can think of.    I doubt it would be the only. 

I got one right...what are the other several ?


The "real thing" is only part of the equation. At least by my way of looking at the situation.  I assume your "real thing" means a hen that is ready and willing to copulate.

The most basic reason of all lies in the fact that turkey calling relies on working against nature. Under normal circumstances the gobbler expects the hen to come to him.  If you have a gobbler that is honoring every call you make and still not budging, then you have a gobbler that is still expecting you to start closing the distance and present yourself.  That is not always possible. When it is, I normally drop everything except for the shotgun and a call and try to close the distance.

In some cases, given the proper mood of the gobbler, the proper calls, the proper disposition of other hens, etc. the gobbler may come to you.  On the other hand, I have seen very interested lone gobblers hang up, at the slightest obstruction and refuse to go any further.  It's as though they're testing the hen: "If you really want it, you'll come to me." 

In half the cases I have encountered, I would say that other hens are involved in this some how, either directly mingling with the gobbler or communicating with him from another direction. This is a huge reason for the gobbler not coming in. In most circumstances, a gobbler will not leave hens in sight to go after a more distant unseen hen, no matter how much convincing.  I have pulled it off by sneaking around and re-positioning.  I've pulled it off by running off the other hens. I have pulled it off by attracting the hens and then going silent, not moving and letting the hens come past and picking off the trailing gobbler.

Another good reason is simply a matter of misreading the gobbler.  The gobbler is walking on your calls, you think he's hot, but he's not. At least not how you think-- real thing or not. I know my gobblers' strut zones pretty well.  However, I can imagine trying to hunt my gobs cold.  You don't know it, but my gob's in his afternoon strut. He'll answer all right, but he wants you out in the middle of that pasture  or clearing before he'll think of coming over to you. One of his attending jakes or other sub-dominant male may break off and come in, but not him. 

Which brings up one of the oddball reasons:  sometimes, and I'm not sure why, gobblers are more interested in demonstrating for each other than for the hens.  I'll catch several gobblers out in the pasture trying to one-up the other, and letting the hens go. They'll honor calls just fine, but they ain't gonna budge from their little strut fest.  I see this more in the late Winter, but we had a cold Spring last year and I witnessed this a couple of times early in season, and I've seen this also at other times.

That's a few of the reasons I can come up with.
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