Poult Watch

User avatar
kygobbler
 
Posts: 1310
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 3:49 am
Location: KY

Re: Poult Watch

Postby kygobbler » August 29th, 2013, 8:35 pm

I found where I read it. http://www.biokids.umich.edu/critters/M ... gallopavo/
It says turkeys can reproduce when they are 10 months old. By using the word turkey in general I'm not sure if they mean hens or Jakes.
Image

User avatar
WillowRidgeCalls
 
Posts: 3506
Joined: May 25th, 2009, 4:26 pm
Location: Reeseville Wisconsin

Re: Poult Watch

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » August 29th, 2013, 9:32 pm

Personaly, I believe that the breeding season for a bird is faily short, maybe 3 weeks? Your dominant bird will be the first to breed all the hens he can, your sub-dom birds will sneak in a bird where ever they can. Some will go to different areas where the dom bird has been taken. I believe a jenny has to be a year old to breed, that's why we see a few hens in the spring that stay with a gobbler all spring, because the older hens have run the off as they are getting ready to nest. If they were a late born bird they may have missed the breeding cycle or become of age to breed after it's over, that's why we see hens without poults late spring and early summer. With the large hatches we've had the last couple years there were quite a few late born birds. Once a hen been bred she will come into heat at the regular breeding time of the year. We see a few strutters late spring and into the summer, but I believe that has more to do with the dominance factor or he could of been a late born bird that wasn't ready to breed early spring and he's still is pent up but no hens are available for breeding? If we see a long bird that's strutting, more times than not it was a sud-dom bird that got put in his place all spring, so he's off by himself still looking because he's affraid of the other gobblers? the hens are bred by their age, an old hen will breed first and the younger hens breed last, that's why when we call we change our calling tactics and the sounds of our calls to match the breeding cycle of the hens.
WillowRidgeCalls
WI Youth & LTH Mentor
Dodge Co. NWTF
Scott

charlie elk
 
Posts: 1125
Joined: August 7th, 2009, 4:50 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Re: Poult Watch

Postby charlie elk » August 30th, 2013, 8:01 am

kygobbler wrote:It says turkeys can reproduce when they are 10 months old. By using the word turkey in general I'm not sure if they mean hens or Jakes

The site indicates 10 months for male and female. It also says the breeding season is Jan & Feb each year?! Then I thought oh that's in KY but its not, it's a Detroit School site. Don't think MI turkeys breed that early or is there a Detroit, KY? Do KY turkeys breed in Jan & Feb?

WillowRidgeCalls wrote:We see a few strutters late spring and into the summer, but I believe that has more to do with the dominance factor

Most of the time I agree, the vast majority of strutting taking place June and after is clearly pecking order related as is most of the gobbling. In the last couple of years, 1 with a perfect spring and this last not so perfect spring I have seen strutters courting hens through July. At first I thought these shows were anomalies, now I am not so sure about that and have begun hypothesizing it is a continuation of the "breeding season." ?
For many years I agreed with willow's statement totally; I'm not that sure of myself anymore.
later,
charlie
If you agree with me call it fact; if you disagree - call it my opinion.
After all - we are talking turkey.

User avatar
WillowRidgeCalls
 
Posts: 3506
Joined: May 25th, 2009, 4:26 pm
Location: Reeseville Wisconsin

Re: Poult Watch

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » August 30th, 2013, 9:44 am

charlie elk wrote:
kygobbler wrote:It says turkeys can reproduce when they are 10 months old. By using the word turkey in general I'm not sure if they mean hens or Jakes

The site indicates 10 months for male and female. It also says the breeding season is Jan & Feb each year?! Then I thought oh that's in KY but its not, it's a Detroit School site. Don't think MI turkeys breed that early or is there a Detroit, KY? Do KY turkeys breed in Jan & Feb?



That could be, some years we find nest toward the end of March depending on what type of spring we have, like the spring we had a couple years ago, some of the hens were going to nest before the season ever started. Most states don't start their season until the tail end of the breeding season. Ithink the northern states are more March and April. Jan - Feb could be the deep southern states? Although there can be a few early hens, but I think for the most part the breeding seasons are a bit later, at least up here?

WillowRidgeCalls wrote:We see a few strutters late spring and into the summer, but I believe that has more to do with the dominance factor

Most of the time I agree, the vast majority of strutting taking place June and after is clearly pecking order related as is most of the gobbling. In the last couple of years, 1 with a perfect spring and this last not so perfect spring I have seen strutters courting hens through July. At first I thought these shows were anomalies, now I am not so sure about that and have begun hypothesizing it is a continuation of the "breeding season." ?
For many years I agreed with willow's statement totally; I'm not that sure of myself anymore.[/quote]


I agree, they say the breeding seasons are established by the amout of sun light, but I think it has a lot to do with the ground temps also, where if we have a later cold spring like this year, the breeding season is later or vice a versa? The sun light may trigger when a bird is capable of breeding, but I think the ground temp has to do with when they start breeding?
WillowRidgeCalls
WI Youth & LTH Mentor
Dodge Co. NWTF
Scott

User avatar
ads1
 
Posts: 204
Joined: February 18th, 2013, 6:11 pm
Location: South Eastern Illinois

Re: Poult Watch

Postby ads1 » August 30th, 2013, 3:42 pm

Just able to get back on the forum. In my area I am seeing fairly mature poults and last week saw some quail size poults.
Image

User avatar
kygobbler
 
Posts: 1310
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 3:49 am
Location: KY

Re: Poult Watch

Postby kygobbler » August 30th, 2013, 8:40 pm

Charlie, as far as I know we do not have a Detroit, KY. Although I did find out last week we have towns named Monkeys Eyebrow and Possum Trot. :lol: :oops:

Even though our season starts around April 15th, I believe they start mating by mid to late March. Like Scott said most states don't start their seasons until the end of the breeding cycle.

I would think if a poult was born in August and at 10 months that would put her to be able to breed in June. If she is willing to breed I don't think a tom would turn her down just because it isn't spring time.

Now I have seen hens in the fall that didn't have any little ones with them. I sometimes wondered if it was because they were hatched late and couldn't be breed at the time or if predators had eaten their young. To me that's just one of the wonders of nature.

Here is another curve ball I just thought of and some what supports the old school thought of the day light deal. A hen will go to the tom to be breed in the morning due to he is more fertile. The hotter he gets the less fertile he is. So if a hen, who hasn't been breed, goes to him in June or July. Is he fertile enough due to the weather being around 20-30 degrees hotter? I know I'm getting way off in left field but now I'm curious.
Image

User avatar
WillowRidgeCalls
 
Posts: 3506
Joined: May 25th, 2009, 4:26 pm
Location: Reeseville Wisconsin

Re: Poult Watch

Postby WillowRidgeCalls » August 30th, 2013, 9:39 pm

kygobbler wrote:Charlie, as far as I know we do not have a Detroit, KY. Although I did find out last week we have towns named Monkeys Eyebrow and Possum Trot. :lol: :oops:

Even though our season starts around April 15th, I believe they start mating by mid to late March. Like Scott said most states don't start their seasons until the end of the breeding cycle.

I would think if a poult was born in August and at 10 months that would put her to be able to breed in June. If she is willing to breed I don't think a tom would turn her down just because it isn't spring time.

Now I have seen hens in the fall that didn't have any little ones with them. I sometimes wondered if it was because they were hatched late and couldn't be breed at the time or if predators had eaten their young. To me that's just one of the wonders of nature.

Here is another curve ball I just thought of and some what supports the old school thought of the day light deal. A hen will go to the tom to be breed in the morning due to he is more fertile. The hotter he gets the less fertile he is. So if a hen, who hasn't been breed, goes to him in June or July. Is he fertile enough due to the weather being around 20-30 degrees hotter? I know I'm getting way off in left field but now I'm curious.


Our trains are on the same track of thought. With the high number of jakes we had running around the last couple years, could answer why we are seeing quite a few small poults at this time of the year? With the late hatches those birds weren't ready to breed at the normal time. The years that we don't have a good hatch, the next year we don't see that many late hatches, if you can follow what I'm saying? That's why I believe the breeding cycle is fairly short for adult birds?
WillowRidgeCalls
WI Youth & LTH Mentor
Dodge Co. NWTF
Scott

charlie elk
 
Posts: 1125
Joined: August 7th, 2009, 4:50 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Re: Poult Watch

Postby charlie elk » September 3rd, 2013, 1:48 pm

kygobbler wrote:A hen will go to the tom to be breed in the morning due to he is more fertile. The hotter he gets the less fertile he is.

I have never done a sperm count on a hot to hotter gobbler so I don't feel qualified to comment. ;)
later,
charlie
If you agree with me call it fact; if you disagree - call it my opinion.
After all - we are talking turkey.

User avatar
kygobbler
 
Posts: 1310
Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 3:49 am
Location: KY

Re: Poult Watch

Postby kygobbler » September 3rd, 2013, 4:48 pm

charlie elk wrote:
kygobbler wrote:A hen will go to the tom to be breed in the morning due to he is more fertile. The hotter he gets the less fertile he is.

I have never done a sperm count on a hot to hotter gobbler so I don't feel qualified to comment. ;)


:lol: :lol: :lol:

I've never checked for sure myself either but I do remember reading that at a Holiday Inn. :lol: :lol:
Image

Previous

Return to Wisconsin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests