State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

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mark hay
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby mark hay » February 17th, 2009, 1:41 pm

it's always been , according to 50+ years of observation by an old red headed fart, that the warmer weather comes by the lengthening of the daylight hours .

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silvestris
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby silvestris » February 17th, 2009, 1:43 pm

The desire, instinct, or whatever it is that causes a gobbler's sperm to be deposited in the ovaries of a hen is brought on by the photoperiod, increased day length.

Weather, be it cold, hot, dry, wet, still, windy, high or low pressure, whatever will have an effect on whether they want to do it on a given day.

It is that simple.  Gobblers are turned on a little earlier than hens.  ONnce breeding is in full swing, hens may run all over the country dropping an egg here today, there tomorrow, until something clicks and she enters the nest building mode.  The hens know when to get serious, and temperature can have a great influence on that.  But they will have been breeding long before the nest building phase kicks in.
Why be good when you can B-Mobile or Spin & Strut.

deja vu
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby deja vu » February 17th, 2009, 2:01 pm

Toms gobble for two main reasons - 1) To attract hens and 2) to proclaim their dominance over subordinate males. They will, however, shock gobble to just about any loud noise

 
OK, so what your saying is that as soon as a tom gobbles.... every hen in the area say OHhh it`s time to breed! Here I come Mr Tom!!
 
More likely, just like about every other creature (including us humans) the females will determine when the breeding will take place.
 
"Old School Elitist"

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silvestris
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby silvestris » February 17th, 2009, 2:05 pm

That is right, deja vu.  When the hen crotches before the gobbler once the length of day reaches a certain point, breeding will occur.  Happy, happy, joy, joy.
Why be good when you can B-Mobile or Spin & Strut.

greyghost
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby greyghost » February 17th, 2009, 2:10 pm

This is an excert from The Wild Turkey and its Management by Oliver Hewitt and The Wildlife Society (1967)

Increasing day length brings turkey to sexual maturity. In domestic stock sexual maturity may be advanced several months by subjecting the birds to 14 hours of artifical light, (Margolf, Harper and Callenbach, 1947). Light indirectly activates the reproductive organs, both male and female, by first stimulating the pituitary through the nervous system. The initial stimulus is apparently received through the skin as well as through the eyes (Romanoff 1947:51) These reference if you can find them really details a lot more on the subject. Although I do not have them I read both a few years ago (memory bad) so would not even try to state any more then what is in the Hewitt book.

wisturkeyhunter
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby wisturkeyhunter » February 17th, 2009, 2:14 pm

I don't normally copy and paste but this was to good to pass up. This is written by the Wi dnr biologist and can be found on there website.
"
[left][size=150]The breeding season for wild turkeys
[/left][left]occurs during spring when increasing day[/left][left]length triggers breeding behavior (gobbling[/left]and strutting) in males."
[/size]

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Fan Club
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby Fan Club » February 18th, 2009, 3:14 am

ORIGINAL: wisturkeyhunter

"
[size=150]The breeding season for wild turkeys
occurs during spring when increasing daylength triggers breeding behavior (gobblingand strutting) in males."
[/size]


 
That's correct. In the interest of full disclosure one more sentence should be added-
 
Current weather conditions, food availability, and hunting pressure, which all affect turkey behavior, can and will influence breeding behavior. 

Bottom line.
 
"The joy of living is his, who has the heart to demand it." Teddy Roosevelt

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tracebusta32
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby tracebusta32 » February 18th, 2009, 3:43 am

I appreciate you pasting the rest of that fan club, I can't get them the realize that you can't have one without the other but bottom line is warmth is the main reason for breeding
Malachi 4:5-6
My Brother: WMB

StevePA
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby StevePA » February 18th, 2009, 4:06 am

Ive known a few southern belles in my time but you truely take the cake..Birds here begin breeding in March..and its freakin cold out!....20's and 30's....
turkeykiller

wisturkeyhunter
 
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RE: State Turkey Biologist Responses to Peak Season

Postby wisturkeyhunter » February 18th, 2009, 4:22 am

ORIGINAL: Fan Club

ORIGINAL: wisturkeyhunter

"
[size=150]The breeding season for wild turkeys
occurs during spring when increasing daylength triggers breeding behavior (gobblingand strutting) in males."
[/size]



That's correct. In the interest of full disclosure one more sentence should be added-
 
Current weather conditions, food availability, and hunting pressure, which all affect turkey behavior, can and will influence breeding behavior. 

Bottom line.


I don't know where you got that but it says nothing of weather where I got my quote from the Wi dnr website.

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