The Real Mating Call

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silvestris
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby silvestris » February 18th, 2009, 3:11 am

You know you are about to cause a resurgence in those swing around your head on a string type drumming callers, don't you?
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby Fan Club » February 18th, 2009, 3:21 am

> Why Gobble when you can drum up hens strutting?

Given more thought, I look at the drumming noise as the true mating call and the gobble as the challenge the world call. <


Hmmmmm. Maybe that could help explain the "Strut Zone."
 
[;)]
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trkyklr
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby trkyklr » February 18th, 2009, 3:36 am

 i  know low frequency sounds travel further than the high frequency sounds...i think its the emu that  uses strictly drumming for attracting a mate...i could see your point tc maybe drumming is the "true" mating call & they gobble to challenge others...maybe that explains why they shock gobble when you throw out a loud noise at them....hmmm. 

greyghost
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby greyghost » February 18th, 2009, 4:28 am

ORIGINAL: TurkeyComander

I came upon this theory about the drumming sounds of a wild turkey back in the 1990's.
I was studing biOlogy (watching the Discovery channel)

Given more thought I look at the drumming noise as the true mating call and the gobble as the challenge the world call.

 
There are a few of us that would agree or lean toward that.

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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby Ozarks Hillbilly » February 18th, 2009, 5:51 am

I never was any good in biology or any other subjects in school other than maybe recess and lunch. But does anyone know how a Turkey makes that sound we refer too as drumming. I assume it has something to do with the way the expand there bodies when there strutting. In turn I would also assume that they can not produce this sound without strutting?  Not that it matters I just wondered.
These Ozark Mountains Ain't High But The Hollers Sure Are Deep

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tracebusta32
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby tracebusta32 » February 18th, 2009, 6:01 am

 It's a mating call for sure.  At times, I've been in the woods with hens in front of me, and then behind me I've heard a gobbler drumming.  As I watched, the henswould come to attention and go running to him.  For that reason, I know drummingis one of the turkey's mating calls.
A drumming call can sometimes be heard 150 yards away in the woods.  The sound is made deep in the gobbler's chest and is very resonant and hollow.  The best way to describe drumming is to say it sounds like an 18-wheeler shifting gears.  Often, I've been in the woods and heard an 18-wheeler several miles away slow down and shift gears, and I haven't been sure whether I heard the 18-wheeler or a turkey drumming. 
 
Few hunters use the drumming call.  But drumming can be practiced, learned, and used very effectively to take gobblers. 
 
Often you can use a drumming call alone to get a gobbler to come to you.  It's productive when an older gobbler hangs up 50 or 60 yards from you, and you can't decide whether to gobble at him or not.  If he's a sub-dominant turkey, a gobble may run him off.  I usually give the drumming call, and many times that will break him out of his strut.  Even if he hasn't been strutting, it will bring him in to check out this other gobbler drumming near the hen she thinks he's heard.
Another kind of drumming, which most hunters completely overlook, is the kind a turkey does on his roost.  A turkey doesn't have to be in full strut to drum, but he does have to hold his tail at least barely out and spread, and lay his head back.  At times, I've seen turkeys strut and drum on the limb.
When the weather is inclement, or when dogs or hunters have harassed the turkeys, often turkeys drum rather than gobble.  Most of the time, they'll be drumming on the limbs in the mornings before they fly down.  If you listen for that drumming in the morning, many times you can find a turkey without having to hear him gobble.
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Cut N Run
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby Cut N Run » February 18th, 2009, 9:03 am

ORIGINAL: Fan Club

> Why Gobble when you can drum up hens strutting?

Given more thought, I look at the drumming noise as the true mating call and the gobble as the challenge the world call. <


Hmmmmm. Maybe that could help explain the "Strut Zone."
 
[;)]

 
**Ding-Ding-Ding***  No more calls please, we have a winner!
 
 
After having the privledge to watch a major strut zone from a distance in pre-season, to then hunt the same zone for several years, it has revealed some different habits Gobblers use during their Spring mating season.
 
I have seen & heard many hens come to Gobblers when he was out of sight of the hen and the only calling he was doing was spitting & drumming.  Now, the Hen just might have known that this was THE place to be from all the gobbling done there recently, but I usually don't see as much single hen traffic there unless one is hanging around looking for a Gobbler. I have also had a few dozen mature gobblers come to my calls at that same strut zone, and while they gobbled in the distance to answer my calls, they came in spitting & drumming only.  On windy days, you'd think they were silent, but the drumming was barely audible.
 
Last season when hunting at a different place, I also had a nice Gobbler come straight to my calls. While he gobbled in the distance, as soon as he got near where he was hearing the calls eminate from, he started spitting & drumming.  When he found no Hen, he started back to where he'd come from.  As soon as he got out of sight, I cutt and purred, to be answered instantly by gobbles.  Then, as soon as he could view the flat I was set up on, a hen went right to him...leaving me with an un-notched tag. Both birds were visible to each other, but the Hen traveled toward the flat I was on from the opposite direction & she did not travel down the draw he had been gobbling from (making me think she was responding to the drumming).
 
Whenever one of us takes out the Boss Gobbler where we hunt, the other subordinate Gobblers establish a new pecking order.  A lot of mornings when I have been hunting, a few different gobblers get fired up just after dawn & when the Boss started gobbling, the rest of them shut up.  We have also seen Mature Gobblers (other than the Boss) courting hens when they didn't gobble, possibly for fear of the Boss coming & kicking their butt and stealing the hen. It only makes sense that those Gobblers might have called the Hens by drumming.
 
I'm not an expert by any means & I can only go by what I have witnessed. I'd be interested to hear what others think from their hunting/scouting experiences. I think there is plenty of proof to the statement that drumming must be the mating call.  I only hear Gobblers drum in the Spring, where I have heard gobbles almost any other time of year.
 
Jim
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby Ozarks Hillbilly » February 18th, 2009, 9:37 am

Like I asked earlier I am not sure a Turkey is able to strut without drumming or vise versa. I think the Turkey struts to aid in attracting his mates so I would say that drumming would in turn help in attracting his mate also. I am sure A hen can hear the sound of his drumming long before she could she him strut in alot of instances. I would also assume she would associate the sound with mating.
These Ozark Mountains Ain't High But The Hollers Sure Are Deep

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dmcianfa
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby dmcianfa » February 18th, 2009, 9:46 am

Great Topic, but I have a couple questions maybe someone could answer!

Can someone explain how to make both the drumming sound and the spitting sound of a gobbler with a call of some sort?  I have never heard anyone use these calls before to attract a bird, only hen calls and an occasional gobble call.  I may post a new topic in the "Calling" portion if anyone feels this is not the place to ask this question.  Also, does anyone know where you can get an actual sound clip of this?  I've heard it in the wild during hunting, but if I learn to do these calls I would like to compare it to that of a clip to determine if it is in fact close or not.
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Cut N Run
 
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RE: The Real Mating Call

Postby Cut N Run » February 18th, 2009, 11:21 am

Spitting & drumming are pretty quiet calls. I can usually only hear them out to about 75 yards or so on a still day. The spit is kind of sharp, like Pffffftt, then quickly followed by the drum sounds ( which almost sounds alien) that can be held fairly long, like VRrooooouuummm.  Once you hear it, you will know exactly what it is and will never forget it (especially if the bird is real close when he does it)...Those sounds will likely be followed by the sounds of your own heartbeat in your ears.  If they are that close, you will quickly understand what the intensity of Turkey hunting is all about. 
 
Several times, I've heard a Gobbler spit one time, only to be followed by several drumming sequences when the bird was very intent on locating the Hen calls He'd heard.
 
I have also had Gobblers come in on breezy days when the spitting was barely audible, but the drumming was louder than normal. I can only guess why.
 
Sorry I can't point you to a sound clip to hear it.  There is probably one out there, I just don't know where to tell you to look.
 
Jim
Luck Counts, good or bad

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