Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Guns, ammo, and more! What do you shoot, and why?
User avatar
Ben Sobieck
 
Posts: 185
Joined: October 30th, 2008, 9:34 am

Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby Ben Sobieck » June 17th, 2009, 8:15 am

Bad shots are the number one reason hunters leave the woods empty-handed, according to the turkeyandturkeyhunting.com poll. It sounds obvious, but there actually are many reasons hunters lose birds.

If you've missed a bird, why? What will you do different next time?

Image
Image

Dcoleinpa
 
Posts: 346
Joined: May 6th, 2009, 8:20 am

RE: Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby Dcoleinpa » June 17th, 2009, 9:54 am

just got too pumped up and took too far of a shot. ill wait next time haha

icdedturkes
 
Posts: 443
Joined: January 28th, 2009, 8:54 pm

RE: Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby icdedturkes » June 17th, 2009, 4:51 pm

Mis-judging the range does happen occasionally. But there is absolutely no excuse for taking a "poor shot" on a turkey. I cringe when folks talk of shooting through brush or a hole in brush etc etc

Idiots should not be allowed in the woods. One should only take a shot when the head and neck are fully visible and within there established range.

As for "fever" that would be my excuse, it happens and is very difficult to overcome.

User avatar
cuttnrun1187
 
Posts: 68
Joined: June 1st, 2009, 6:48 pm

RE: Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby cuttnrun1187 » June 18th, 2009, 7:24 am

I have to wonder how often nerves/gobbler fever contributes to a poor shot or misjudged range. I missed a bird this season due to being too pumped up, excited, impatient and misjudging the range. For myself, I considered all of these combined into two words... gobbler fever! This was the first turkey I missed for a long time. I felt horrible and was left with all of the "What if..." qustions a guy could imagine. The only peace I have from this miss was the fact that the gobbler was back to his same old tricks the next day (last day of season) and seemed unharmed. Wait till next year... yes he a little wiser but I finally figured out where he likes to go mid morning!

User avatar
Turkeybuster
 
Posts: 1903
Joined: May 24th, 2008, 5:56 pm

RE: Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby Turkeybuster » June 18th, 2009, 3:57 pm

cuttnrun1187 don't be too hard on yourself we all have done it at one time or another it is part of the game. I agree with icdedturkes with shooting only when the head and neck are extended and within range. I passed on two birds this year which I feel would have both been dead birds but the one would have been a border line shot in a open field and the other bird was well within range I could see his neck extended but some brush covered his head and two hens were beside him one on each side.
So rather than make a mess of things I passed however I do know that both birds are still roaming the woods so who knows maybe this fall with a little luck our paths will cross again. They are both exceptional birds. I feel most misses within range come from watching the bird and not getting your head down on the stock properly, shooting too quick or shooting from a awkward position usually this comes from excitement or as you call it turkey fever. I consider these misses very acceptable and will happen to all of us however wild shots and shooting beyond the effective range of your equiptment are not. You can be sure that you will analize your next shot before you pull the trigger this is what makes us all better hunters it is part of the learning curve.
Turkeybuster

User avatar
MAKEemQUIVER
 
Posts: 565
Joined: April 14th, 2008, 2:22 pm

RE: Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby MAKEemQUIVER » June 19th, 2009, 11:38 am

I once got in a bad habit of raising my head off the stock of the gun. I'm embarassed to say it but I was pulling my head off the stock right before I would pull the trigger. I was looking to see the bird flopping, but instead I was watching birds run and fly off.
 
Now every time I am lucky enough to get a bird to committ I tell myself several times to keep my head on the stock until I hear the roar. Of course gobbler fever gets me also [:@].

User avatar
mark hay
 
Posts: 2880
Joined: August 19th, 2008, 1:59 pm

RE: Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby mark hay » June 19th, 2009, 12:42 pm

I been there,,,I done that too. Excited ! Blood pumpin' so fast and hard I can't seem to be able to focus on the bird and what I NEED to do with my head and the gun , and judge the distance , pick a clear shooting lane . make sure his head is high , is it a jake or tom , ,,,,is that someone else callin' ,,,DA' GUMMIT! now my glasses are foggin' up.

User avatar
Fan Club
 
Posts: 1368
Joined: April 13th, 2008, 5:24 am
Location: Calhoun County, Michigan

RE: Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby Fan Club » June 19th, 2009, 5:05 pm

The term "poor shot" can encompass a lot of scenarios. While misjudged the range seems to be popular, I submit that the position of the turkey at the shot is probably more important and seldom mentioned.
 
Most hunters learn about the cheek off the stock early on and don't make that mistake too many times. Likewise a well patterned gun and load combination will probably kill a turkey at forty yards even if the shooter thought it was closer to thirty. But if the turkey's head is moving, the bird is walking, the bird is feeding or the bird is strutting it is going to be lower percentage and less than ideal shot.
 
Deer hunters are taught that the position of the animal is everything for a one shot humane kill with minimal tracking. A poor angle shot can often result in a wounded deer that travels a considerable distance and is not recovered. Probably because a shotgun throws a pattern, turkey hunters are told to "Shoot 'em in the head," and that's about it. The rest is trial and error as they learn the hard way that the side of a turkey's head is wider than the front and that a walking turkey's head is constantly moving.
 
My 2 cents worth, anyway.
"The joy of living is his, who has the heart to demand it." Teddy Roosevelt

User avatar
Turkeybuster
 
Posts: 1903
Joined: May 24th, 2008, 5:56 pm

RE: Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby Turkeybuster » June 20th, 2009, 5:02 pm

Good thought Jeff ,did you ever pull the trigger and see the bird pull his head down just as the gun went off I did and it will result in a clean miss at short yardage every time.
Turkeybuster

User avatar
Bobbyparks
 
Posts: 865
Joined: May 24th, 2009, 4:45 am

RE: Bad Shots Lead Causes of Missed Birds

Postby Bobbyparks » June 21st, 2009, 3:21 am

When you look up the word "missed shot" in the Hunters Dictionary, it refers to me.

Most of my misses were early on and had to do with GF. I'd look down my barrell too soon and even though the bird was trying to come in, I'd try and shoot too soon. Nerves just couldn't handle it

Other misses were a combination of being too close and the fact that I'm a recoverying trigger jerker (mostly true when I was shooting an 835 with 3.5 shells)

I definitely get the bird to raise his head before I shoot as some of my misses were partly a result of shooting at a bird that was in strutt
 
I would say mine have been more due to nerves than misjudged distances. This may sound stupid but I can judge distances pretty well and I relate it all to passing a football etc 

Even though I've killed some birds, I still get so excited at the moment of truth that I have to keep talking to myself, get my breathing straight and keep telling myself to squeeze the trigger.

Next

Return to Shooting

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests