diffrent calls

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DeanoZ
 
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RE: different calls

Postby DeanoZ » February 3rd, 2009, 10:55 am

Thanks Ozark....one last question..and after exhausting everythign in my bag of tricks, at what point do i cut bait and find a new location?

thundrchikin
 
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RE: different calls

Postby thundrchikin » February 3rd, 2009, 11:21 am

Hillbilly offers some very sound advice,as far as the second ? experience will help in this area.By the way Hillbilly where are you from in Missouri. I hunted Dent county in the mid 90's great area & people.
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Ozarks Hillbilly
 
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RE: different calls

Postby Ozarks Hillbilly » February 3rd, 2009, 12:11 pm

Deanoz that is a judgment call,it comes with experience and a lot of trial and error. Mostly error I have been chasing these birds for over 30 years and I screw it up more times than not. But those screw ups are part of the learning curve that we all have to go through. If he has responded to your calls but fails to come into your set up it can be a thousand different things hanging him up you have to realize your going against his nature to come to the hen. He is just gobbling to let you know where he is so you can come and join his party. He may have hens with him already,There may be  barrier like a creek or a fence or something he doesn't want to cross. Sometimes if you just shut up you can play on his curiosity he will think that hen has left and get him to break and come in. Sometimes if you can make a big circle on the bird and call from a new location will get the old tom to come in. If you hear hens with him you can call to the hens and they may drag the old Tom your way. If you mock an old hen a lot of times yelp for yelp and get her mad and aggressive she will come to you looking to run off this loud mouth. Even if she wasn't with the Tom he mite come over to watch the fight. There is a ton of good info on this site in Turkey and Turkey Hunting Magazine and hundreds of books. I suggest you read everything you can. School will be in session this spring and that old Tom Turkey is the best teacher of all.
 
Thunderchikin I reside in Douglas County in south central Missouri.

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dmcianfa
 
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RE: diffrent calls

Postby dmcianfa » February 3rd, 2009, 12:44 pm

ORIGINAL: DeanoZ

Jim,

thanks for your informative response and advice which I will wisely heed.  I suspected that "less is more" would be the protocol for Turkey calling so I will keep to the basics and stick with some basic yelping at first...if that does not work I'll try my hand at clucking and as a last resort some cutting.  Now I guess the big question would be is how much calling is enough...I know it will vary based on the situation so let me throw out two scenarios:

1.  I start off with some locating calls...I locate a bird and setup.  I wait for daylight..I see nothing roosted in the trees but knwo he is close by...as daylight breaks and goes on still nothing...do I perform a series of yelps..and if so how many is a series and how long and often should I continue calling?

2.  Same as above but a gobbler flies down and I have eyes on him.  as sson as he flies down I thorw out a series of yelps (again, need to know how many?)  No response the gobbler keeps doing his thing...so now do i try some clucking?  If so how much calling?  Then if he still does not respond after that should I throw in some cutting?  If he responds and staets coming towards me do i stop calling all together, and only throw out a call if he stops and still is not within range?

I guess what I'm looking for is for someone to quantify how much calling is enough?

Thanks!

 
I still think nobody answered his questions here.  How often, timing, what calls in this situation.  Someone needs to pony up![:D]
"After eating an entire moose, a mountain lion felt so good he started roaring. He kept it up until a hunter came along and shot him. The moral: When you're full of bull, keep your mouth shut."

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DeanoZ
 
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RE: diffrent calls

Postby DeanoZ » February 3rd, 2009, 3:04 pm

I still think nobody answered his questions here. How often, timing, what calls in this situation. Someone needs to pony up!

 
Thanks dmcianfa...and while I did receive some VERY good advice, understanding what "a few yelps" (Is that 3, 4, 5 or more?) and for what duration would certainly help me.  I also understand the value in letting someone realtively new to the sport figure things out on his own via trial and error....but it sure would help this newbie get a jumpstart [:D]  Thanks all I'm appreciative of the help and support thus far!

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Gobblerman
 
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RE: diffrent calls

Postby Gobblerman » February 3rd, 2009, 7:13 pm

Okay, DeanoZ, I've got a little more time now so I'll take a shot at your hunt situations.  Once again, my opinions only...should not be construed to be Gospel by any means.

First situation....you've heard a bird before daylight using a locator of some sort.  You move in close....it starts getting light...but no more gobbles, or other turkey noises.  Possibilities:  you got too close and spooked the bird, or....you are dealing with an older gobbler that has learned not to gobble much on the roost.  Either way, you are looking at a tough situation.  If you don't think you have spooked the bird...i.e.--you didn't hear "putting" or wing beats indicating he has flown away, then you are likely on an old, wary bird, or one that has had a bad experience with a phantom hen recently.  I have rarely seen birds that would only gobble one time on the roost unless they are suspicious of something. At any rate, calling to him on the roost, assuming he is still there, is likely to be counterproductive.  The best course of action in this type of situation is to sit and be still and silent and hope that he gives himself away somehow.  Patience is the key here. 

If you hear other huntable birds in the distance, it might be best to head for one of them, especially if they are gobbling with any regularity.  If you don't, then you should play the waiting game.  If he is there, he will eventually come out of the tree...hopefully, you'll hear him glide or fly to the ground.  Regardless, at some point....usually when its near full light, but before the sun is up....you will have to make the decision to call to him.  Once again, with this type of gobbler, less is usually best....a couple of soft clucks is a good start, perhaps in combination with some discrete leaf-raking sounds (some of the experienced wing-users should chime in here). 

If this bird is the only game in town, then patience and control over your desire to expand your calling is paramount.  With this type of gobbler, uttering anything more than a few soft clucks or yelps, and maybe some purrs, at intervals every few minutes, is most likely a mistake.  If he has not gobbled, or otherwise given himself away in an hour, then you should have by now assumed you are dealing with a very tough customer. 

If he remains silent, and you have exhausted your patience for this duel, then you may make the decision to throw caution to the wind and begin some experimentation with your calling.  Stay simple at first....a relatively soft series of say, five to seven yelps.  See what response, if any, you get.  In another minute, try another series, this time a little louder and with maybe a few sharp clucks thrown in at the start of the call.  Next, try a short cutting sequence, followed by several louder yelps.  If none of this brings a response, it's "Katey bar the door" from that point.  He probably ain't comin'....and in fact, may well be on his way to parts unknown...so you may as well try about anything you want with him. 

However, if you are hunting a small property, and this bird is your only real hope of success, you may want to forego the aggressive tactics and consider easing out and returning later to try to arouse his interest.  Regardless, there are virtually limitless tactics and calling options that can be used at this point, and it is essentially a W.A.G. as to what is best to do, so just learn the different calls and stay after 'em.  Also, the conservative tactics outlined here apply to this specific type of gobbler, and are not necessarily the best tactics to use with more vocal birds, two-year-olds, gobblers with hens, or any number of other circumstances and conditions.

Jim

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Fan Club
 
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RE: diffrent calls

Postby Fan Club » February 4th, 2009, 3:22 am

That's some quality information, Jim. Most folks on this board won't take the time to type that much, they'll just come back with a sarcastic one line response challenging something that was stated.
 
> understanding what "a few yelps" (Is that 3, 4, 5 or more?) and for what duration... <
 
For reasons unknown, most hunters, and especially newbies, seem to call with 5 and 7 note yelp sequences. (hum a few bars in your head, you'll see what I mean). I think it has to do with those numbers of notes providing a rhythm. The longer I hunt, I find that shorter 3 and 4 note calls are more effective, particularly if they are not all the same and there is an accent or volume increase on at least one note. Turkeys evidently don't care about rhythm.
 
Gobblerman has mentioned the axiom that once a call is emitted, you can't bring it back. Along the lines of economy of calling, the more you call the more time a gobbler has to pinpoint your location and figure out that the calls are not quite right. Calling just enough to keep track of the gobbler's location seems to be the ticket.
 
As a final note, I read something once in the Turkey Hunter's Digest that is seldom heard or discussed. A longtime guide stated that "The fewer yelps a hen emits in response to a gobbler is an indication of how far she is willing to go to meet him. A single yelp indicates she's come as far as she's going to and isn't coming any further."
 
Food for thought. I haven't been able to prove that last "single yelp" theory as I usually shut up once a gobbler is approaching. What I am sure about is that economic calling has worked for me.
"The joy of living is his, who has the heart to demand it." Teddy Roosevelt

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silvestris
 
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RE: diffrent calls

Postby silvestris » February 4th, 2009, 4:00 am

Get some turkey recordings (I suggest Lovett Williams) and let the real turkeys teach you how to call.

I know this is a simple one-line answer with little typing, but it is the best advice you will get on calling.  Turkey calling can't be taught with a typewriter.
Why be good when you can B-Mobile or Spin & Strut.

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Fan Club
 
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RE: diffrent calls

Postby Fan Club » February 4th, 2009, 4:34 am

> I know this is a simple one-line answer with little typing...<
 
It is, but the sarcasm is minimal so I can live with that.
 
> Turkey calling can't be taught with a typewriter...<

 
I beg to differ. That's good advice and DeanoZ should get some turkey recordings. But there is no subtitute for time in the woods and seeing and listening to real turkeys. Hearing how they interact with each other in different situations is even better than a tape or CD.
 
Therein lies the problem. Sir Deano has no experience and in the spirit of a forum, Jim and I are willing to share some of what we have learned, unlike select others.  The teaching here does involve a keyboard and the lad needs a baseline to start with. Most of the members on this forum are here to share information and experiences, not invalidate and discount what others have posted. The last part is a shame.
 
"The joy of living is his, who has the heart to demand it." Teddy Roosevelt

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DeanoZ
 
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RE: diffrent calls

Postby DeanoZ » February 4th, 2009, 4:39 am

Ozarks, Gobblerman, Fan Club and Silvestris, thank you all for your time and detailed responses, they are much appreciated and helpful.  I will get the turkey recordings suggested, and certainly it seems that economy of calls is in order and i will heed that wise advise.  One more point of clarity, Ozark you seemed to suggest that once I've located a bird and set in that its ok to call to him ( I'll presume in the hopes of getting him to fly down?), while it seems Gobblerman suggests not calling while on the roost and waiting for him to fly down...and if it gets close to sun up and he still has not flown down then I should call?  Thanks again all for the great advice...this is great!

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