Tips on hunting without roosting.

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Allegan Bowhunter
 
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Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby Allegan Bowhunter » February 7th, 2010, 9:36 pm

Hey guys,

Was hoping you could help me with something.  I have done some searching/reading and am unable to find any answers.

I work evenings and normally (on work nights) am not able to get into the woods to roost birds for a morning hunt. 

What can I do to increase my chances of finding the birds in the morning?  I am new to seriously hunting turkeys not just wandering hoping to find one.  I hope to learn the patterns as much as I can once winter breaks.

I will me mainly on public land in SW Michigan.

Thanks in advance for your help.

JC

Duke0002
 
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RE: Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby Duke0002 » February 8th, 2010, 4:18 am

JC,    During the day, walk the area to find possible roosts.  Locate droppings, feathers, etc.  Then you have a general idea where they might be roosting.  Locate similar areas -similar landscape, trees.  These might hold roosting birds as well.  Even thought you cannot pinpoint roosts the night before you hunt,  you've got something to go by. 

With that general idea in mind, during the day try to observe any travel routes to strutting zones, feeding areas, or any other places they may spend their daylight hours.

During the day when hunting, listen for gobbles and hen talk, then move toward the area and set up appropriately.  Lot's of birds are taken this way.  You might not take a bird immediately after fly down, but you'll have fun scheming and calling.

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Bobbyparks
 
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RE: Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby Bobbyparks » February 8th, 2010, 4:54 am

I agree with Duke0002 that it will come down to scouting and figuring out areas birds are using .

This includes feeding, strutting, and dusting to have an idea where to start.

Where I hunt it'd be kind of hard to find roosting locations unless you just lucked into them depending on the terrain you're hunting.


Otherwise you get back to the basics of covering ground to strile up a bird but by knowing where you've seen sign you can focus on those areas.

If its a day birds are quiet you'll have an idea of where to set up and spend your time.
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paboxcall
 
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RE: Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby paboxcall » February 8th, 2010, 5:48 am

Get out the week or two before opening day and listen at daybreak; you will begin to see patterns in their roost sites day to day, which narrows your options come day one of the season.
"So much of this business of hunting turkeys, you stupid it up right at the last.
You do everything right for an hour and a half, and then you sit down here
and there's nothing you can do about it, you made a mistake."
Tom Kelly, [i]Turkey Tales

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eggshell
 
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RE: Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby eggshell » February 8th, 2010, 2:54 pm

I rarely ever roost birds. The main reason is I know from many years of hunting the same land where most likely they will be. Even in strange areas I will find a good listening spot and go after whatever I hear. I'm not all that hyped on being on him at sunup. I kill more birds after 9:00 AM than first thing off the roost. Heck I have killed birds almost every hour of the day. So stay in the woods as long as legal and slip around to set ups and do some soft calling. I'll usually set a 1/2 hour on a spot and move.  Now in states where they allow all day hunting I am in the woods hunting come evening,that will often give me a chance to roost one. For the most part, in Ohio where we quit at noon, my evenings are spent parked on a fishing hole.

Many morning I wait to start in the woods right at gobble time, I have killed public land birds others walked right by in the dark.

headshot870
 
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RE: Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby headshot870 » February 9th, 2010, 6:12 am

While your scouting, and some will laugh at me for saying this, don't forget to use your nose! I've found a couple roost sites because I got into an area & it smelled like a chicken house, not nearly as strong, but the same smell. I followed the smell right to the roost trees. If you find that on public land, & it's a good ways back in (1+ miles or more), that place will be money come first light & you'll most likely have it all to yourself![:D]

Other than that, if you can't get out to roost 'em, get to an area where you can listen for them (ridge line over looking a river bottom or hollow, etc.). Just remember the old combat saying, "be aggressive enough, soon enough". Go to the active bird...close the distance & make things happen!

Good luck this season,

Nathan

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NEStrut
 
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RE: Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby NEStrut » March 21st, 2010, 12:30 pm

ORIGINAL: paboxcall

Get out the week or two before opening day and listen at daybreak; you will begin to see patterns in their roost sites day to day, which narrows your options come day one of the season.


Agree with this 100%. As said before on here many times, turkeys are creatures of habit. If you can determine a general area the birds are in prior to the season starting, even if you aren't directly on the exact roost tree in the morning, you should be close enough to make a legitimate attempt at the birds.
If the only prayer you said in your whole life was, "thank you," that would suffice.

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Gobblerman
 
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RE: Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby Gobblerman » March 22nd, 2010, 2:39 pm

Allegan, I gather from your post that you are unable to roost birds in the evening only.  Being in the woods at daybreak (morning), if you can do it, is almost always the key to finding gobblers.  I have said this many times before, and I will say it again, spring gobbler hunting is about locating gobbling turkeys....and that occurs by hearing them gobble most of the time.  When are they most likely to gobble, either on their own or from someone using a locator call?...During the first hour of daylight. 
 
Assuming you are hunting a sizeable tract of public land, get where you can hear as far as possible at first light and be very quiet and listen for a while.  If there are gobblers in the vicinity, they will most likely start gobbling a short while before sunrise.  But if you have not heard one or more gobblers within thirty minutes before sunrise, then use a locator call....a really loud, obnoxious crow call usually works just fine.  Give a couple of really loud quick blasts on the call....not too long because gobblers that respond will come back right on top of the call....so if you call too long, you might not hear them over your calling.  Don't overdo the locator calling.  Most often, any responsive gobbler in the area will fire back on the first locator call. 
 
If on the first locator series, you don't get a response, wait 15 to 30 seconds and do it again. Always be still and listen quietly after you use the locator!  Often you will hear birds that are just at the edge of hearing, and if you are noisy, or shuffle around, or have the vehicle running, or any other such nonsense, you will miss long-distance gobbles. 
 
If you do not get a gobble response after the second locator series, and if you have the option, move on.  If you are hunting a large area with a good road system, then jump in your vehicle and drive down the road another half mile, or to another good listening vantage. 
 
Repeat this process as many times as you can, on as many mornings as you can, and in as many different good listening spots as you can, and you will find the gobblers if they are there to be found!
 
Jim

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kenturkey89
 
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RE: Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby kenturkey89 » March 22nd, 2010, 3:19 pm

JC I'm really in the same boat as you. I don't have any time to scout because I'm always in school. I do plan, however, to get out there this Saturday morning at sunrise with my crow call and listen for a few talking turkeys. I also plan on going again the week before season opens just to make sure the birds haven't moved around a whole lot.

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Bobbyparks
 
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RE: Tips on hunting without roosting.

Postby Bobbyparks » March 22nd, 2010, 6:05 pm

ORIGINAL: Gobblerman

Allegan, I gather from your post that you are unable to roost birds in the evening only.  Being in the woods at daybreak (morning), if you can do it, is almost always the key to finding gobblers.  I have said this many times before, and I will say it again, spring gobbler hunting is about locating gobbling turkeys....and that occurs by hearing them gobble most of the time.  When are they most likely to gobble, either on their own or from someone using a locator call?...During the first hour of daylight. 

Assuming you are hunting a sizeable tract of public land, get where you can hear as far as possible at first light and be very quiet and listen for a while.  If there are gobblers in the vicinity, they will most likely start gobbling a short while before sunrise.  But if you have not heard one or more gobblers within thirty minutes before sunrise, then use a locator call....a really loud, obnoxious crow call usually works just fine.  Give a couple of really loud quick blasts on the call....not too long because gobblers that respond will come back right on top of the call....so if you call too long, you might not hear them over your calling.  Don't overdo the locator calling.  Most often, any responsive gobbler in the area will fire back on the first locator call. 

If on the first locator series, you don't get a response, wait 15 to 30 seconds and do it again. Always be still and listen quietly after you use the locator!  Often you will hear birds that are just at the edge of hearing, and if you are noisy, or shuffle around, or have the vehicle running, or any other such nonsense, you will miss long-distance gobbles. 

If you do not get a gobble response after the second locator series, and if you have the option, move on.  If you are hunting a large area with a good road system, then jump in your vehicle and drive down the road another half mile, or to another good listening vantage. 

Repeat this process as many times as you can, on as many mornings as you can, and in as many different good listening spots as you can, and you will find the gobblers if they are there to be found!

Jim

 
 
This man knows what he's talking about.  This would be worth printing out and saving if you're kind of early in the game
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