Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Ask questions of and offer advice to fellow turkey hunters
charlie elk
 
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RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby charlie elk » February 28th, 2010, 11:44 am

He will call a bird in with the gun on his lap and when its in shooting distance he will just grab it pull up and bam! He said that turkeys dont react fast enough for that to matter. I have never tried it and I am not sure that I will.... Anyone else heard this before?


Happens to me.....
Does the bird die? Depends on how blurry my vision is upon waking up to see him.[:D][:D][:D][:D][:D]
later,
charlie
If you agree with me call it fact; if you disagree - call it my opinion.
After all - we are talking turkey.

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eggshell
 
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RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby eggshell » February 28th, 2010, 12:51 pm

He will call a bird in with the gun on his lap and when its in shooting distance he will just grab it pull up and bam! He said that turkeys dont react fast enough for that to matter.


I had a guy tell me this years ago and I thought maybe he's right, afterall I had watched several birds just kind of fidget around when they spotted you.

So i had this really tough ole tom i wanted real bad and I happen to get position on him one day on this trail he liked. so i called once up the hill and moved down about 40 yards fast. I done this because he always hung up. Well it was a steep bank and hard to prop my knee up enough and I knew holding off hand for very long ws not going to work, so I remembered what Oris said. So hear i am with gun down watching and here comes Tom turkey and i can tell he's cautious but he's coming and he thinks I'm up the hill further. At 26 yards he stops and starts doing his looking thing that he always does at 50-75 yards, I'm sitting there thinking, "I got you this time buddy". Just like wing-shooting I click the safety and pull up all in one motion, low and behold I can not acquire my target, where is he? I drop the gun just enough to see him lifting off the hill, he was way faster than me. If I had held my gun as close to ready position as possible I believe i would have killed him, I never did. From that day on my gun is up ready when a bird is close, no exceptions.

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Fan Club
 
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Location: Calhoun County, Michigan

RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby Fan Club » February 28th, 2010, 2:31 pm

ORIGINAL: NYSuperSportsman
I have a cousin that will call a bird in with the gun on his lap and when its in shooting distance he will just grab it pull up and bam! He said that turkeys dont react fast enough for that to matter. I have never tried it and I am not sure that I will.... Anyone else heard this before?

 
Never tried it on a turkey, but the maneuver doesn't work very well on deer. I can promise you that!
 
[:@]
 
 
"The joy of living is his, who has the heart to demand it." Teddy Roosevelt

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flatrock9
 
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RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby flatrock9 » March 5th, 2010, 4:18 am

I'll just give ya' one (there have been MANY)

Last day of season in Alabama.  Stubborn ole bird wouldn't gobble at a call.  I was on a WMA that had gotten lots of pressure.  He gobbled off the roost, hit the ground gobbling, and walked away gobbling.  I let him walk and left him alone for a couple hours.

When I came back on the other side of the hollow he was gobbling only every so often, and wouldn't answer any call.  I was able to get just shy of the top of the ridge opposite of the bird.  I was probably 60-70 yards away.

I set up on a small tree (not many to choose from) and started scratching leaves and clucking sparingly.  The last time he gobbles he has gotten above me up the ridge.  I am now out of position so I slide around the back of the tree to put it between us. 

Within a few minutes I hear him walking about 25 yards away, further to the right then what I expected.  I get the gun on him and immediately start second guessing.  He is standing there looking for me, getting a little nervous.  His head is in full view, but from his waddles to his beard is blocked by a leaning sapling.

At that range I am thinking there is no way I get the load in him with that sapling in the way.  It's just too tight (so I thought).  He turns and walks away without a shot being fired.  Hindsight I now KNOW I could have taken him easily, but I was waiting for the perfect shot.

It was probably my most satisfying hunt, as this was an old bird that had been heavily pressured and I got him in range,  but also my most frustrating as I just couldn't pull the trigger when I should have.  I shoot 25 yard shots in preseason just to give myself confidence.

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mcvitullo
 
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RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby mcvitullo » March 5th, 2010, 4:29 am

ORIGINAL: Fan Club

ORIGINAL: NYSuperSportsman
I have a cousin that will call a bird in with the gun on his lap and when its in shooting distance he will just grab it pull up and bam! He said that turkeys dont react fast enough for that to matter. I have never tried it and I am not sure that I will.... Anyone else heard this before?


Never tried it on a turkey, but the maneuver doesn't work very well on deer. I can promise you that!

[:@]


   I think without a doubt, I would miss. I get my gun up long before I see an approaching gobbler.
Fall turkey hunting is boring?! Have fun sitting in your deer stand....

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RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby Fan Club » March 6th, 2010, 3:13 am

ORIGINAL: flatrock9
It was probably my most satisfying hunt, as this was an old bird that had been heavily pressured and I got him in range,  but also my most frustrating as I just couldn't pull the trigger when I should have. 


FR9-

I used to beat myself up over hunts like that too. One year after I called a wary gobbler back into range but didn't close the deal, my mentor (also the best turkey hunter I ever met) told me, "Hey, you won that hunt... you did everything right, you just didn't pull the trigger." Of course he was right. It was among my most satisfying hunts as well and that was why. There's something gratifying about pulling a mature deer or turkey in that close and then letting them walk. There aren't too many folks that can do what you did, look at it from a slightly different angle and give yourself the deserved credit.
"The joy of living is his, who has the heart to demand it." Teddy Roosevelt

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flatrock9
 
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RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby flatrock9 » March 8th, 2010, 3:55 am

I'll give one more, just for closure[;)]

I carried my daughter out on a youth hunt when she about 9 or 10 (can't remember).  We set up in a thinned pine thicket and quickly got an answer from a 2yr old bird. 

Caity had shot her .410 a few times but was still not comfortable looking down the barrel at her target.  I had purposely kept her from shooting too much to keep her from getting gun-shy. 

The bird came in on a rope.  In less than 10 minutes he had closed the 150 yards to about 7 yards.  He stopped behind a pine log directly in front of us with his big ole' red head looking for his hen. 

As I mentioned, Caity was not yet comfortable looking down the barrel.  She had been putting the bead on the target, but had been looking over the barrel, thus shooting high.  As she aimed I gently put my finger on the gun to ease it down a bit.  When she pulled the trigger the full load went into the pine log. She was actually doing it right but dad just had to help[:o].  The bird, slightly stunned, gobbled and walked 90 degrees to our right, not getting over 10 yards away.  We were able to get reloaded but by now she was not sure she wanted to shoot again.  The bird walked past us again headed right back to where it had been, gobbling all the way.

She hasn't let me live this one down.

craigr
 
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RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby craigr » April 3rd, 2010, 6:27 am

I've made many mistakes over the years.
 
First year hunting when it was a draw system, I would call to the birds everytime they would sound off. Needless to say I didn't even see a bird that year.
 
Use to have no confidence or patience in my position when working a bird and would move way tomuch only to have him gobblin in the previous area I was in. That don't happen anymore.
 
When hunting birds I pressured, was in the habit of using the same calls over and over again along with the same decoys, was making the bird more cautious and he would spook as soon as he seen my decoys. Only had a handfull of calls back then but now have around 50+ when the time calls for switching up, also don't use the decoys near as much.
 
I've learned alot over the years of turkey hunting and learning more everytime out.

TreeTrunkNarcoleptic
 
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RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby TreeTrunkNarcoleptic » April 3rd, 2010, 2:33 pm

Walking out of the woods with my daughter's boyfriend about noon last year, and a booming gobble goes off.  It's so close I'm not sure if it came from in front of us or behind us.  Within seconds two more gobbles and it sounds like it's less than 100 feet ahead along our path.  I quickly motion for us to grab a tree and we get set-up.  He's goy my shotgun and I'll do the calling.  I set up facing the other way just in case the bird does the ole' end around trick.   ......And moments later I hear a soft buzzing noise.  ......It's his blackberry and my daughter has picked this moment to text message him. [:@]
 
Not too worried though, he'll quickly acknowledge it (or not) then shut his phone off and stick it back in his shirt pocket, right ?   .......Right ???
 
Wrong.
 
No, he has to hammer out a text message of his own before he puts the danged thing away.
 
......And of course she has to reply to him
 
 
.......And he has to reply to her again.   .......And back and forth between the two of them a few more times. 
 
 
.......So much for a chance at bagging a hot gobbler. [&o]
 
 
Biggest mistake was not making him leave that phone in the truck.
"You can't grill it 'till you kill it."

Kawboy888
 
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RE: Tell Me Your Mistakes!

Postby Kawboy888 » April 3rd, 2010, 11:55 pm

I have made these mistakes for the most part, same mistakes with both Mirriams in southern New Mexico (mountains of Lincholn National Forest south of Cloudcroft), North Western PA hills and the flat lands here in western NY.

Moving on a bird to soon - I have bumped gobblers that were still in the roost over an hour after the sun came up because they were gobblin everytime I touched my call. I tried to move in closer, they busted me from their elevated perch. FLY DOWN ALREADY!!!!!
- What I learned was to be much more patient and try very hard to hear that bird moving. Either hear him getting closer, farther away, more to the east or so on. I focus on listening to determine this. If it sounds like he is in the same place and the sun has only been up an hour, I will not get any closer than my estimate of 200 yards.

Calling to much - The more a bird responds, the more we call. I never thought that every time I make a call, I am trying to fool a very intelligent animal. My calling too much caused birds to either leave, or come in silent to investigate.
 - What I learned was to remember that everytime I play a call, I am trying to fool an animal into thinking that I am fluent and natural in his vocabulary. And that I am drop dead gorgeous, single, and hot for him. Fooling a bird into thinking you are the real deal is hard to do once, let alone many times. Don't call too much. Just call enough to get him to come in.

Calling to close - This lesson I have learned in two parts, with and without decoys. I never understood how great a turkey's vision was when I was a teenager. I also had no clue on how using decoys made a difference when it came to calling. Calling birds when they are too close makes them VERY nervous and skitish. People think that when turkeys do that "spinning" thing at 50 yards all fanned out that they are excited and showing off. If they do circle or spin and then leave, they did the spinning out of fear and were looking for trouble, hence leaving, and if you were calling to them when they did this, that's probably why...too close.
- What I learned from this was to shut up and smile. My code of conduct is that when I see a Tom responding to my calls or decoys, I get ready to shoot, even if he is 200 yards away. I call very very little and only if he changes direction. Let his curiosity bring him in the rest of the way. If you can see him, he can see you.
   - When using decoys I learned that both male and females will commit to a decoy. Meaning that when they are within 20 or so yards of the decoy, they will most likely close the distance on their own to investigate. Once a turkey has committed to the decoy, do not call, no purring!

Set-up - In southern New Mexico it was easy to roost the Mirriams. I would set up on them, usually by sitting up against a tree, wait for them to fly down and try to call them in. I got busted most of the time. Same thing with eastern birds.
- What I learned was to do more scouting and pattern the birds from the roost to their feeding and sun bathing areas. Don't settle for the comfort of sitting up against a big old tree. Have something infront of you. Whether it's a log, a pile of rocks, even if you have to snip a few fronds from a pine tree and stick them in the ground, break up you outline.

Act like a hen, not a hunter - When I first started I would walk around and call every ten minutes or so. Had some luck with this, it's how most people locate birds. The problem is that's what hunters do, not what hens do. How often do you see a hen walk by you screaming a yelp? Most of the time when I see a hen walk by me heading to a feeding area she is crying. She is making super soft and quiet whimpering noises.
- What I have learned is that a hen is just like a human woman. If you are in your car and you pull up next to a hottie with your window rolled down, is she going to flirt with you? Will your odds be better if she ends up at the same bar as you and you meet her there? Yes, woman are more comfortable to mate when they are in a comfortable place, not while they are in transit, dealing with their kids at the grocery store or pumping gas. Understand the psychology of the birds. I tend to see hens much more vocal when they get to their desired location. If you can, hunt and call from this location. Think of all of the times that you have seen a hen walk by you, did she even make a single note of noise??

Love the hens and call them in - I used to think that calling a hen in was a bad thing. It was a set of eyes that I did not need close to me. I would simply watch the hens move along and did not understand their value.
 - What I learned is that the Tom wants that hen. Call her in and try to hold her in your area. She is the real deal decoy, her voice is true and pure and she will attract a lot more attention that I can attract with my calling. Love the hens, use them to your advantage.

Cardinal Sin of all time - Once you shoot, (with a gun) run your butt over to that bird and assume that he is only knocked out cold. If you have a gun, have it ready to shoot from a safe distance. Do not use your gun to beat the bird to death like my 16 year old cousin did last year with his Remington 870. Bent the stock bolt and trashed the stock.
 - What I learned was that feathers are like chain mail armor. How many times have you rolled a bird or knocked one out only to have him get up ten seconds later and run away. Move in on your bird if you can. The only reason that I wont move in quickly is if my camera man also has his bow and we are trying to get a double.

Look before you pee - I can't count how many times I have spooked birds by getting up too fast to pee. Or by getting up for any reason. We are out there during a season because that is the best time of year due to how much the turkeys are talking and moving. Let's not forget that they move quietly more than they move vocally.
 - What I learned was to try and pretend that there is a bird 50 yards away everytime I move. Whether it's to grab a sandwich or stand up. I also don't want to attrat the attention of other animals like squirrels. I'm not sure if a squirrel bark will make a turkey nervous, but it annoys the snot out of me.

There are many more lessons that I have learned and will continue to learn but these popped out in my memory and seem to be some of the more important mistakes in my history.
Rich Leathers
Leathers Archery
"Instruments of Mass Destruction"

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