turkey transition periods

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nubnit13@aol.com
 
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turkey transition periods

Postby nubnit13@aol.com » April 1st, 2010, 11:13 am

I was curious if anybody had a site of where to find the transition periods for turkeys? Thanks for any suggestions.

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Gobblerman
 
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RE: turkey transition periods

Postby Gobblerman » April 1st, 2010, 12:14 pm

Is that like the "solunar tables"? Image  You'll have to be a bit more specific on what you are talking about?  I'll bite.....
 
Jim

JeffCrez
 
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RE: turkey transition periods

Postby JeffCrez » April 1st, 2010, 4:10 pm

nubnit13, A few years back Knight & Hale produced a booklet called "Gobbler Guide" which addressed the transitions turkeys evolve through during the season. It was even divided up by geographical regions accross the US. I've seen them for sale on EBAY from time to time. A lot of useful and interesting info. Discusses gobbling peaks, mating and nesting periods, and how it affects the hunter. Also a nice collectable.
"Fall hunting is maneuvers, Spring hunting is war".......Tom Kelly

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Cut N Run
 
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RE: turkey transition periods

Postby Cut N Run » April 1st, 2010, 5:21 pm

The best way to figure out what transition period the turkeys are in is to be observant when you're hunting.
 
If gobblers are following flocks around and not gobbling too much, they are still in an early phase. 
 
Next, They'll be traveling with fewer hens, as some hens may already be nesting. There will be more individual gobblers versus groups of gobblers like early on.
 
The next phase is when it is game on.  Hens are less interested in gobblers because the majority of hens are on the nest. Now is a good time to hunt mid-morning as gobblers are lonesome and still ready to get busy.
 
The last phase is where gobblers have probably covered all the hens, but are still feeling it & may become interested in jenny hens.
 
I borrowed that gobbler guide from a friend of mine years ago. I carried it in my turkey vest and would read it during lulls in activity until I pretty much had memorized the periods (not like there's all that much to it).  I gave it back after a vest weight reduction several years ago. I'm sure there's some more to it, but that's the basic schedule.
 
Jim
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Everyday Hunter
 
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RE: turkey transition periods

Postby Everyday Hunter » April 1st, 2010, 5:28 pm

ORIGINAL: JeffCrez

nubnit13, A few years back Knight & Hale produced a booklet called "Gobbler Guide" which addressed the transitions turkeys evolve through during the season. It was even divided up by geographical regions accross the US. I've seen them for sale on EBAY from time to time. A lot of useful and interesting info. Discusses gobbling peaks, mating and nesting periods, and how it affects the hunter. Also a nice collectable.

Knight & Hale were talking about transition periods on their TV show today. I caught just the end of it, but David Hale said that if you understand the transition periods, it will make you a much better turkey hunter.

If you check the Outdoor Channel schedule you might be able to catch that show again in the next day or two.

Steve
When [url="http://www.EverydayHunter.com"]"The Everyday Hunter"[/url] isn't hunting, he's thinking about hunting, talking about hunting, dreaming about hunting, writing about hunting, or wishing he were hunting.

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Treerooster
 
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RE: turkey transition periods

Postby Treerooster » April 1st, 2010, 7:36 pm

I've always refered to it as the breeding phases.

What I have seen is in some late springs they can be in semi wintering flocks. Not the real large 50 to 150 bird flock but 15 to 20 bird flocks. Then the break up fully into breeding flocks of a couple of toms and 3 to 6 hens or so. Early the toms can have hens all day. After a while the hens start to spend more time away from the toms as laying increases and you will find more lonely toms at mid morning to early afternoon. As the season gets late the toms can be without hens for most of the day.

I don't think there is a real set time for the different breeding phases as it can be dependant on weather to some extent. Also the local climate too. Like the elevation differences in Colo.




I remember that little book by K & H. I am in Colo and they didn't consider elevation. Just that turkeys would be earlier in the south and later in the north.

The turkeys in NE Colo at 4800 ft are always ahead of the turkeys in SW Colo at 8000 ft. You can see that the jakes have fewer long tail feathers as a rule too in SW Colo.

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eggshell
 
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RE: turkey transition periods

Postby eggshell » April 2nd, 2010, 2:15 am

It has never really mattered to me, I hunt when season (hunting phase) comes in. I do read the birds and whether they are bunched up, henned up or whatever, but every hunter is doing this. The most successful ones are those who adapt best. If breaking into phases helps go for it, but sometimes I think we make this too technical and we really need to make it instinctual.

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Fan Club
 
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RE: turkey transition periods

Postby Fan Club » April 2nd, 2010, 3:41 am

ORIGINAL: eggshell
I think we make this too technical and we really need to make it instinctual.


Great observation. I just sold my K&H "Gobbler Guide" set on E-Bay last week. As a traveling hunter it really peaked my interest and I studied it intently the year I got it. When we got to Missouri that year it was the strangest spring ever. Absolutely no foliage, it looked like January, but temps were in the high 80s, it felt like July. The turkeys were all screwed up and the transition period information had zero relevancy. Turkey transition periods are something all turkey hunters should know about, but are of questionable value when applied to actual day to day hunting. They do not take into account early or late spring weather patterns, elevation as has been noted or other factors such as hunting pressure.

I agree, your best bet is to be observant, try to identify what transition the birds are in for yourself and adapt your hunting style to that.
"The joy of living is his, who has the heart to demand it." Teddy Roosevelt

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shaman
 
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RE: turkey transition periods

Postby shaman » April 2nd, 2010, 7:01 am

Here's a great article on turkey transition from the standpoint of a Kentucky hunter.  It's from Kentucky Afield,  Spring 2003.

http://fw.ky.gov/spg03mg6.asp
Genesis 9:2-4 Ministries of SW Bracken County, KY
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NEStrut
 
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RE: turkey transition periods

Postby NEStrut » April 2nd, 2010, 2:59 pm

ORIGINAL: eggshell

but sometimes I think we make this too technical and we really need to make it instinctual.


Amen......
If the only prayer you said in your whole life was, "thank you," that would suffice.

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